antitrust law

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antitrust law

Legislation that limits the ability of an enterprise or group of individuals to monopolise a service or product, thereby controlling and restricting free trade.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

antitrust law

Government Legislation that limits the ability of organizations or groups of individuals to monopolize a service–or product, thereby controlling and restricting free trade. See Safe harbor rules.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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With this effect now being felt, it is also interesting to note that all areas of anti-trust law have been increasing this year, including compliance, State aid and collaborative arrangements.
It is not clear what impact the new anti-trust law will have on the recently approved reforms to the Ley Federal de Radio y Television (LEFERYT), which gives the major television and radio networks the rights to control new digital technology (see SourceMex, 2006-04-05).
The sale allows the US-based Law & Business unit to sharpen its focus on core areas such as securities law, mergers and acquisitions law, anti-trust law and intellectual property, Wolters Kluwer Legal & Regulatory's CEO Stacey Caywood said.
Among the topics are harmonizing private and public approaches in a more differentiated enforcement model, what is going wrong in the debate over collective private enforcement in anti-trust law, the production of evidence in Central and Eastern Europe, and the ideal model.
Orbitz also lists vacation packages, hotel rooms and rental cars and has come under intense scrutiny, with employees required to attend a four-hour seminar on anti-trust law.
Reynaldo Umali reminded the government on anti-trust law to protect local companies from big foreign interests.
Under the country's anti-trust law (Republic Act No.
According to the Commission, the fees for Siberian overflights run counter to international aviation law (Chicago Convention) and to EU anti-trust law, which establishes that airlines may not be obliged to sign commercial agreements with a direct competitor.
The Commission has been trying for years to have these fees abolished, considering them in breach of international aviation law (the Chicago Convention) and EU anti-trust law. An EU-Russia agreement, concluded in late 2006, establishes that European airlines will no longer pay these charges from 1 January 2014, and that between 1 January 2010 and the end of 2013, these charges will be lowered in line with the negotiations conducted by each airline concerned with Aeroflot.