antinuclear antibody

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an·ti·nu·cle·ar an·ti·bod·y (ANA),

an antibody showing an affinity for nuclear antigens including DNA and found in the serum of a high proportion of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and certain collagen diseases, and in some of their healthy relatives; as well as about 1% of otherwise healthy people. Different antinuclear antibodies generate distinctive patterns on immunofluorescence staining tests. These patterns have clinical relevance and reflect which nuclear constituents (autoantigens) are generative specific antibody responses.

antinuclear antibody

n. Abbr. ANA
Any of various antibodies that react with nuclear antigens such as nucleic acids and histones and are often present in the blood of people with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

antinuclear antibody

Any of a number of circulating antibodies directed against various antigens in the nucleus, including histone, double- and single-stranded DNA, and ribonucleoprotein. ANAs are often present in serum of patients with SLE and other connective tissue diseases.

antinuclear antibody

ANA Immunology Any of a number of circulating antibodies that are directed against various antigens in the nucleus, including histone, double- and single-stranded DNA, and ribonucleoprotein; ANAs are often present in serum of Pts with SLE and other connective tissue diseases. See Speckled pattern.

an·ti·nu·cle·ar an·ti·bod·y

, antinuclear factor (ANA, ANF) (an'tē-nū'klē-ăr an'ti-bod-ē, fak'tŏr)
An antibody showing an affinity for cell nuclei, demonstrated by exposing a cell substrate to the serum to be tested, followed by exposure to an antihuman-globulin serum; found in the serum of a high proportion of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and certain collagen diseases, in some of their healthy relatives, and in about 1% of unaffected people.

an·ti·nu·cle·ar an·ti·bod·y

, antinuclear factor(ANA, ANF) (an'tē-nū'klē-ăr an'ti-bod-ē, fak'tŏr)
An antibody showing an affinity for cell nuclei, demonstrated by exposing a cell substrate to the serum to be tested, followed by exposure to an antihuman-globulin serum; found in the serum of a high proportion of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and some collagen diseases.
References in periodicals archive ?
Devreese, "Automated indirect immunofluorescence microscopy enables the implementation of a quantitative internal quality control system for anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) analysis," Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, vol.
Labs at diagnosis of antagonist-induced lupus-like syndromes Serological marker Result Anti-nuclear antibody 1:640 (previously 1:160 @ [RA.sup.+] diagnosis) Anti-SSA antibody Positive Anti-dsDNA antibody 14 IU/mL Anti-Smith antibody Negative Anti-Histone antibody 1.9 U Anti-Chromatin antibody Positive C3 (80-178 mg/dL) 85 mg/dL C4 (12-42 mg/dL) 13 mg/dL Anti-SSA antibody: Anti-Sjogren's-syndrome-related antigen A; Anti-dsDNA: Anti-doublestranded deoxyribonucleic acid; RA: Rheumatoid arthritis; C3: Complement component 3; C4: Complement component 4
Laboratory studies can show leukopenia, neutropenia (including agranulocytosis), elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, normal coagulation studies, and positive autoantibodies including p- and cANCA, anti-nuclear antibody, and lupus anticoagulant.
Characteristic n = 395 Median age, years (range) 58 (28-87) Female/male 338/57 Autoantibody AMA-positive, n (%) 369 (93.4) ANA-positive, n (%) 271 (67.6) Cenp positive, n (%) 119/362 (32.9) * gp210 positive, n (%) 80/260 (30.8) * AMA: anti-mitochondrial antibody; ANA: anti-nuclear antibody; Cenp: anti-centromere antibody; gp210: gp210 antibody.
Rose-Waaler (RWT), Anti-Nuclear Antibody (ANA), Anti-Thyroglobulin
Typically, detection of autoantibodies directed against extractable nuclear antigen's (ENA) is a second-round set of analyses following a reactive anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) test.
Anti-nuclear antibody was absent, rheumatoid factor was negative, complement 3 (83 mg/dl, normal: 77-195) and complement 4 (25 mg/dl, normal: 7-40) levels were normal.
Only a few cases of the prozone phenomenon for anti-nuclear antibody detection have been described.
(21,22) She matched 4 of the 11 criteria of psychosis (neurologic disorder); positive anti-nuclear antibody test; thrombocytopenia and hypocomplementaemia with low C3 (haematologic disorder); and positive antiphospholipid antibody test (immunologic disorder).
Indicators of nonspecific inflammation and autoimmune activity, such as C-reactive protein, rheumatoid factor, and anti-nuclear antibody titers were within normal limits.
These include examinations for L.E., anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), and serum complement (a protein that is decreased during active phases of autoimmune illness).
The test for anti-nuclear antibody was positive at 80 folds for homogeneous and speckled pattern (normal range <40 folds); however, the results for anti-topoisomerase, anti-centromere, anti-ribonucleoprotein, anti-ribonucleic acid polymerase III, and anti-Sjogren syndrome antigen A/Ro and anti-Sjogren syndrome antigen B/La antibodies were all negative.