antiemetic

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antiemetic

 [an″te-e-met´ik]
1. useful in the treatment of vomiting.
2. an agent that relieves vomiting.

an·ti·e·met·ic

(an'tē-ĕ-met'ik),
1. Preventing or arresting vomiting.
2. A remedy that tends to control nausea and vomiting.
[anti- + G. emetikos, emetic]

antiemetic

/an·ti·emet·ic/ (-ĕ-met´ik) preventing or alleviating nausea and vomiting; also, an agent that so acts.

antiemetic

[-imet′ik]
Etymology: Gk, anti + emesis, vomiting
1 pertaining to a substance or procedure that prevents or alleviates nausea and vomiting.
2 an antiemetic drug or agent. ChlorproMAZINE and other phenothiazines are sometimes effective antiemetic agents. In kinesia, scopolamine and antihistamines provide relief. SHT3-receptor antagonists such as dolasetron and the corticosteroid dexamethasone may relieve chemotherapy-induced nausea. Cannabis derivatives such as dronabinol may also alleviate nausea induced by certain antineoplastic drugs in cancer patients.

antiemetic

adjective Countering emesis, vomiting noun An agent–eg, odansetron, granisetron, which prevents or alleviates nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapeutics–eg, cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, dacarbazine, etc

an·ti·e·met·ic

(an'tē-ĕ-met'ik)
1. Preventing or arresting vomiting.
2. A remedy that tends to control nausea and vomiting.
[anti- + G. emetikos, emetic]

Antiemetic

A preparation or medication that relieves nausea and vomiting. Coke syrup, ginger, and motion sickness medications are examples of antiemetics.

antiemetic (anˈ·tē·e·meˑ·tik),

n a substance that can prevent or lessen the feeling of nausea and vomiting.

an·ti·e·met·ic

(an'tē-ĕ-met'ik)
1. Preventing or arresting vomiting.
2. A remedy that tends to control nausea and vomiting.
[anti- + G. emetikos, emetic]

antiemetic (an´tēəmet´ik, an´tī-əmet´ik),

n drug used to prevent, stop, or relieve nausea and emesis (vomiting).

antiemetic

1. useful in the treatment of vomiting.
2. an agent that relieves vomiting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chemotherapy treatments can be classified as moderately emetogenic, meaning that 30% to 90% of patients experience CINV, or highly emetogenic, meaning that more than 90% of patients experience CINV, if they do not receive an anti-emetic.
The availability of the special edition book coincides with the recent announcement by Valeant for the availability of Cesamet (CII) (nabilone) Capsules, a synthetic cannabinoid approved for the treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy in patients who have failed to respond adequately to conventional anti-emetic treatments.
Although the use of anti-emetic agents decreases the incidence and severity of CINV, symptoms continue to occur in 40 to 60 percent of patients.
Ginger (Zingiber officinale) has a number of therapeutic actions, including being an anti-emetic.
Metoclopramide 10mg IV was permitted as a rescue anti-emetic if patient had more than 2 emetic episodes.
The prophylactic administration of anti-emetics may be justified in patients at high risk of developing nausea and vomiting after PACU or hospital discharge.
3) In addition to these benefits, several studies of the use of regional anesthesia in various lower extremity procedures found that regional anesthesia improves postoperative recovery by decreasing postoperative nausea and vomiting, administration of anti-emetic medications, (4) postoperative narcotic administration, (1,3,5,6) overnight hospitalizations secondary to pain, (7) and length of post-anesthesia care unit stay.
One of the major advances in the management of nausea associated with chemotherapy is the improvement in anti-emetic medication.
The objective of this study was to compare the effects of single intra-operative intravenous dose of dexamethasone versus control group on frequency of post tonsillectomy nausea and vomiting and need for rescue anti-emetics in the first 24 hours.
Despite the widespread use of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist anti-emetics such as Palonosetron (Aloxi; Eisai), chemotherapy induced nausea continues to be reported by 70% of adult patients and 58% of children receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy.
Giving anti-emetics to a patient with raised intracranial pressure may mask worsening symptoms.