anxiolytic

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Related to Anti-anxiety agents: anxiolytic drugs

anxiolytic

 [ang″zĭ-o-lit´ik]
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

anx·i·o·lyt·ic

(ang'zē-ō-lit'ik),
1. Synonym(s): antianxiety agent
2. Denoting the actions of such an agent (for example, diazepam).
[anxiety + G. lysis, a dissolution or loosening]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

anxiolytic

(ăng′zē-ō-lĭt′ĭk, -sē-, ăngk′sē-)
adj.
Preventing or reducing anxiety; antianxiety.
n.
An antianxiety medication; a tranquilizer.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

anxiolytic

adjective Pertaining to an anxiolytic noun A drug that reduces anxiety or tension
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

anx·i·o·lyt·ic

(ang'zē-ō-lit'ik)
1. Synonym(s): antianxiety agent.
2. Denoting the actions of such an agent or medication.
[anxiety + G. lysis, a dissolution or loosening]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

anxiolytic

1. Operating to relieve ANXIETY or to treat an anxiety disorder.
2. A drug used to treat anxiety.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Anxiolytic

A type of medication that helps to relieve anxiety.
Mentioned in: Anxiety
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

anx·i·o·lyt·ic

(ang'zē-ō-lit'ik)
1. Synonym(s): antianxiety agent.
2. Denoting the actions of such an agent (e.g., diazepam).
[anxiety + G. lysis, a dissolution or loosening]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about anxiolytic

Q. Can anyone suggest a treatment for plantar fasciitis, apart from ultrasound, physio, anti-inflammatory agents? My friend has had Plantar Fasciitis for more than 1 year and has persevered with all the ususal treatments above plus lots of rest from weight-bearing and elevation.

A. Padded foot splints, silicone heels insert and special shoes (e.g. arch-supporting shoes) may also help. These are usually sold and fitted by a professional. Exercise is another important measure. Some patients benefit from avoiding walking barefoot or in sleepers but rather using shoes from the first step.

More advanced treatments include steroid-local anesthetics injections, botulinum toxin (similar to botox) injections and surgery.

The prognosis is usually favorable, and most patients achieve relief of the pain.

However, all of the above is just for general knowledge - if you have any specific question, you may want to consult a doctor.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007021.htm

More discussions about anxiolytic
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References in periodicals archive ?
Anti-anxiety agents such as buspirone (Buspar) and benzodiazapines (Valium, Klonapin, Ativan and Xanax, for example) have been studied little in autism.
The Canadian team that researched the connection between aggression and psychiatric drugs in a prison population stated that, of all classes, "anti-anxiety agents appeared to be most implicated, with 3.6 times as many acts of aggression occurring when inmates were on these drugs." They maintained: "Considering that certainly not all aggressive personalities are in prison, that frustrations also abound in society and that diazepam [Valiuml is the most prescribed drug in the U.S.
Sedatives Hypnotics Anti-anxiety agents Anti-depressants Anti-arrhythmics Anti-hypertensives Anti-convulsants Anti-psychotics Digitalis and derivatives Drugs with anti-cholinergic side effects Others (mechanism unknown)
Some serotonin-mimicking drugs that attach to 1A receptors "might be considered a major breakthrough in the treatment of anxiety," Peroutka says, because they reduce anxiety without the fatigue caused by other anti-anxiety agents. In 1986, the FDA approved the 1A agonist buspirone for treating anxiety.