pro-life

(redirected from Anti-abortion movement)
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Related to Anti-abortion movement: pro-lifers

pro-life

Pro-choice, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
What followed was the establishment of the "reproductive rights movement," a movement and history many feminists and women's studies librarians do not differentiate from the anti-abortion movement that evolved out of the mainstream women's movement.
As Prevention magazine points out in an excellent article on the subject, the anti-birth-control wing of the anti-abortion movement has been emerging from obscurity over the last decade.
In the past I have always dismissed the anti-abortion movement and viewed them as extremists.
We are well aware that the political wing of the anti-abortion movement has long held ambition to screen a party political broadcast on national television.
Bader's timely hook traces the path of the anti-abortion movement in North America, examining the roles played by the Catholic Church, Protestant fundamentalists and the Republican and Democratic Patties and discussing their interrelationships.
Trouble is that here the Christian Right have as much support as tree worshipping in the Sahara, the anti-abortion movement is a fringe group, and "liberal" is hardly a word of abuse.
The formal reversal of Roe, in other words, might well have strengthened the reproductive rights movement in much the same way that Roe itself galvanized the anti-abortion movement.
In contrast to Calderon, Runner aligns with the anti-abortion movement and, in the past, has supported the school voucher system.
Insisting that human life begins at conception, the anti-abortion movement seeks to shock us into the awareness that abortion means killing--killing a human being rather than an animal, a bird, an insect, or a fish.
The strength of the anti-abortion movement can be found in this tight-knit relationship at the peak of each organisation as well as within the membership which, in effect, carries the fervour engendered by abortion from one group to another.
Their demonstrative use of statues and rosaries at abortion clinic "rescues" horrifies the mainstream National Right to Life Committee, which wants to muffle the religious side of the anti-abortion movement for pragmatic political reasons.
Gorney tells her story by following the careers of two passionate partisans: Judith Widdicombe, a registered nurse and leader in the pro-choice movement, and Samuel Lee, a pacifist and would-be seminarian who became a fixture in the anti-abortion movement.