anthroposophic medicine

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anthroposophic medicine

A holistic approach to health care widely employed in Europe, e.g., for the care of patients with advanced cancer. Although its effectiveness remains unproven, it has gained significant acceptance by patients and some insurers.
See also: medicine
References in periodicals archive ?
Journal of Anthrop Med, 1992, 9, 2, 1-14; with permission: Phycicians' Association for Anthroposophical Medicine)
Gencydo[R], a combination of lemon juice with an aqueous quince extract has traditionally been used in anthroposophical medicine for treating patients with allergic rhinitis or asthma.
Gerald Karnow, a conventionally trained physician who practices anthroposophical medicine at a clinic in Chestnut Ridge, N.Y.
The group's activities include Anthroposophical Medicine (in Europe the sect has its own hospitals), Biodynamic Agriculture, Eurythmy (dance) schools, Camphill Villages for the developmentally disabled, and a church, Christian Community.
Thomas Cowan, MD, has studied and written about many subjects in medicine including nutrition, anthroposophical medicine, and herbal medicine.
Gorter holds a medical degree in conventional Western medicine from the University of Amsterdam Medical School with postdoctoral work in the US, a PhD from the University of Witten/Herdecke in Germany, and specialty training in anthroposophical medicine in Switzerland with an emphasis on oncology.
Cowan has served as vice president of the Physicians Association for Anthroposophical Medicine and is a founding board member of the Weston A.
He has also studied natural and anthroposophical medicine in Germany and biological medicine with the world-renowned Paracelsus Klinic of Switzerland, with later studies providing certification in botanical medicine through the University of Colorado, School of Pharmacy.
Gorter holds an MD degree from the University of Amsterdam, postdoctoral training from the University of California San Francisco Medical School, a PhD from Witten/Herdecke University in Germany, and postdoctoral training in anthroposophical medicine from the Wegman and Lucas Clinics in Arlsheim, Switzerland.
Much later, Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925), the founder of anthroposophical medicine, introduced it as a cancer treatment.
Much later, it was introduced as a cancer treatment by Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925), the founder of anthroposophical medicine (Steiner 1985).
This experience of the collusion between Nazism and the allopathic medical community (not to mention many other crimes perpetrated by leading allopathic doctors) made many Germans in the postwar years wary of the "dictatorship" of one medical philosophy, allopathy, and its persistent attacks on all alternative schools of thought (homeopathy, naturopathy, chiropractic, Anthroposophical medicine, etc.).