anthropomorphism

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anthropomorphism

 [an″thro-po-mor´fizm]
the attribution of human characteristics to nonhuman beings and objects.

an·thro·po·mor·phism

(an'thrō-pō-mōr'fizm),
Ascription of human shape or qualities to nonhuman creatures or inanimate objects. Compare: theriomorphism.
[anthropo- + G. morphē, form]

an·thro·po·mor·phism

(an'thrŏ-pō-mōr'fizm)
Assignment of human shape or qualities to nonhuman creatures or inanimate objects.
[anthropo- + G. morphē, form]

anthropomorphism

Attributing human characteristics to the diety, to inanimate objects, animals, or phenomena. Because of our experiential limitations and need to find explantions, however unsatisfactory, we commonly resorts to an anthropomorphic concept of anything transcendental.

anthropomorphism

the attribution of human characteristics to animals other than man.
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References in periodicals archive ?
the Djahmiyya as unconscious anthropomorphists. (89)
What is it about laysa ka-mithlihi shay that lent itself to the exegetical needs of reputed anthropomorphists?
Syntactically, the ka could be read as a syndetic relative cause (sila) added for emphasis, in which case the reading would be something like, "There (really) is nothing like Him." If the ka is taken as a non-expletive, however, it would then read, "There is nothing like (ka) His likeness (mithlihi)." As Ibn al-Jawzi noted, "taken literally (zahir) these words indicate that God has a mithl, which is like nothing and like which there is nothing." (108) Ibn al-Jawzi cites this verse as one of the proof-texts of the so-called anthropomorphists. They obviously took the mithl here anthropomorphically.
(76) We have elsewhere demonstrated that Ibn Hanbal quite unequivocally was an anthropomorphist in the strict sense: he was adamant about God's anthropoid form.