anthropomorphism

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Related to Anthropomorphisms: personification, Anthropomorphised

anthropomorphism

 [an″thro-po-mor´fizm]
the attribution of human characteristics to nonhuman beings and objects.

an·thro·po·mor·phism

(an'thrō-pō-mōr'fizm),
Ascription of human shape or qualities to nonhuman creatures or inanimate objects. Compare: theriomorphism.
[anthropo- + G. morphē, form]

anthropomorphism

/an·thro·po·mor·phism/ (an″thro-po-mor´fizm) the attribution of human characteristics to nonhuman objects.

anthropomorphism

[an′thrəpōmôr′fizəm]
Etymology: Gk, anthropos, human, morphe, form
the assignment of human shapes and qualities to other animals.

an·thro·po·mor·phism

(an'thrŏ-pō-mōr'fizm)
Assignment of human shape or qualities to nonhuman creatures or inanimate objects.
[anthropo- + G. morphē, form]

anthropomorphism

Attributing human characteristics to the diety, to inanimate objects, animals, or phenomena. Because of our experiential limitations and need to find explantions, however unsatisfactory, we commonly resorts to an anthropomorphic concept of anything transcendental.

anthropomorphism

the attribution of human characteristics to animals other than man.

anthropomorphism

the tendency to attribute human characteristics to animals or inanimate objects.
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References in periodicals archive ?
is the problem of how to affirm God's attributes and transcendence without falling into anthropomorphism, on the one hand, and without emptying God's attributes of concrete meaning, on the other.
But the implication that the premodern Muslim discussions of God's attributes are to be understood only in the context of the bipolar opposition between divine transcendence and anthropomorphism must be rejected.
This tradition of transcendent anthropomorphism, which seems presupposed in the Qur'an as well, places Islam squarely within the tradition of "Oriental monotheism," the Semitic monotheism anchored in the ANE mythic tradition.
Watt, "Some Muslim Discussions of Anthropomorphism," in idem, Early Islam: Collected Articles (Edinburgh, 1990), 87.
Hendel, "Aniconism and Anthropomorphism in Ancient Israel," in The Image and the Book, Iconic Cults, Aniconism, and the Rise of Book Religion in Israel and the Ancient Neara East, ed.
On transcendent anthropomorphism in ancient Near Eastern and Classical tradition, see Hendel, "Aniconism and Anthropomorphism"; Jean-Pierre Vernant, "Dim Body, Dazzling Body," in Fragments for a History of the Semitic anthropomorphism generally, see Esther J.
On biblical anthropomorphism and an anthropomorphic deity, see further Frank Michaeli, Dieu a I'image de I'homme.
See especially Barr; "Theophany and Anthropomorphism.
Imitatio Hominis: Anthropomorphism and the Character(s) of God in Rabbinic Literature," Proofiexts 12(1992): 151.
75) clearly has anthropomorphism in mind when he criticizes the mushabbiha:
Merlin Swartz in A Medieval Critique of Anthropomorphism.
On the Nabita and anthropomorphism, see Williams, "Aspects of hte Creed," 452-53.