anthropomorphism

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Related to Anthropomorphisation: anthropomorphization

anthropomorphism

 [an″thro-po-mor´fizm]
the attribution of human characteristics to nonhuman beings and objects.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·thro·po·mor·phism

(an'thrō-pō-mōr'fizm),
Ascription of human shape or qualities to nonhuman creatures or inanimate objects. Compare: theriomorphism.
[anthropo- + G. morphē, form]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

an·thro·po·mor·phism

(an'thrŏ-pō-mōr'fizm)
Assignment of human shape or qualities to nonhuman creatures or inanimate objects.
[anthropo- + G. morphē, form]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

anthropomorphism

Attributing human characteristics to the diety, to inanimate objects, animals, or phenomena. Because of our experiential limitations and need to find explantions, however unsatisfactory, we commonly resorts to an anthropomorphic concept of anything transcendental.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

anthropomorphism

the attribution of human characteristics to animals other than man.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
But this anthropomorphisation of stones and rocks isn't simply an ancient British and Irish phenomenon, but a tradition with a worldwide distribution: humans in general can be transformed into stones in more than 20 different cultural traditions, including those of Lithuania, Greece, China, the Pacific islands, Greenland, Alaska and Brazil.
Instead, in the latter case a bull's head and some additional paraphernalia are shown mounted on a pillar or perhaps a wooden frame, whose anthropomorphisation remains incomplete at best (Bernett & Keel 1998:21-32, 42-44).
These meanings might allude to any or all of the following topics: the underlying urges and desires to create art through the primal materials of earth, water, fire and air (the ceramic process); the association and anthropomorphisation of pottery with the Great Mother archetype according to Neumann's model of "woman = body = vessel = world"; and how the process of making ceramics and creating kiln gods can be experienced in terms of sacred rituals and numinous experiences.