arthropod

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arthropod

 [ahr″thro-pod]
an individual of the phylum arthropoda.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·thro·pod

(ar'thrō-pod),
A member of the phylum Arthropoda.
[arthro- + G. pous, foot]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

arthropod

(är′thrə-pŏd′)
n.
Any of numerous invertebrate animals of the phylum Arthropoda, including the insects, crustaceans, arachnids, and myriapods, that are characterized by a chitinous exoskeleton, a segmented body, and jointed appendages.

ar′thro·pod adj.
ar·throp′o·dan (är-thrŏp′ə-dən), ar·throp′o·dal (-dəl) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ar·thro·pod

(ahr'thrō-pod)
A member of the phylum Arthropoda.
[G. arthron, joint + G. pous, foot]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

arthropod

Any one the phylum Arthropoda , which includes all the insects, the crustaceans and arachnids. As the name implies, arthropods have jointed legs.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

arthropod

any member of the animal phylum Arthropoda, containing jointed-limbed organisms that possess a hard EXOSKELETON. It is the largest phylum in terms of the numbers of species within it, and includes insects, crustaceans, spiders, centipedes and many fossil forms.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas experimental analyses rarely employ invertebrates as subjects (e.g., protozoa, coelenterates, platyhelminthes, annelids, molluses, anthropods), plants, fungi, monera, and protista are excluded as a rule.
Bugs on the Internet: Information on more than 100,000 North American insects will be available in late 1996.The system is called Biosystematic Information on Terrestrial Anthropods (BIOTA) and is designed to help USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service identify insects and mites.
Ants were fed oats and freshly killed anthropods. A 14 hour light-10 hour dark photoperiod was maintained in the laboratory.
However, the study published Tuesday in the(http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/12/8/20160322) journal Biology Letters found that most bugs were not pests, although dust mites and book lice were fairly common. Wealthier neighborhoods are more biologically diverse as a result of the different kinds of plants in gardens and hence home to a variety of birds, bats and lizards, in addition to anthropods. Scientists called this the "luxury effect."
Called anthropods, which means they have their skeletons on the outside of their bodies, insects have existed on our planet for over 40 million years.
Scientists still are unsure what the mother of all anthropods looked like.