anthropic principle

(redirected from Anthropic argument)
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Related to Anthropic argument: Anthropic principle, Weak anthropic principle

anthropic principle

A utilitarian principle that the laws of physics are intended to allow existence of life in the universe or, put differently, the philosophical consideration that observations of the physical universe must be compatible with the conscious life that observes it.
References in periodicals archive ?
The anthropic arguments suggest, even apart from their theological implications, how intricately interwoven we are, that mind is not an alien intruder in the universe.
It can easily be linked with anthropic arguments about the way that the conditions necessary for the appearance of human beings are connected to the very initial conditions present in the moments after the Big Bang.
Intelligent Design (ID), championed by Berkeley law professor Phillip Johnson, emerged in the late 1980s from three intellectual streams which Donald Yerxa has described as (1) the underdetermination of evolutionary theory, (2) the emergence of anthropic arguments, and (3) the search for new theistic approaches to offset the naturalistic stance of mainstream evolution.