pleiotropy

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pleiotropy

 [pli-ot´rŏ-pe]
the production by a single gene of multiple phenotypic effects. The term is often used to refer to a single gene defect that is expressed as problems in multiple systems of the body, such as in osteogenesis imperfecta, where the gene causes defects in several different systems that contain collagen.

plei·ot·ro·py

, pleiotropia (plī-ot'rō-pē, plī-ō-trō'pē-ă),
Production by a single mutant gene of apparently unrelated multiple effects at the clinical or phenotypic level.
[pleio- + G. tropos, turning]

pleiotropy

/plei·ot·ro·py/ (-pe) the production by a single gene of multiple phenotypic effects.pleiotrop´ic

pleiotropy

(plī-ŏt′rə-pē) also

pleiotropism

(-pĭz′əm)
n. Biology
The production of diverse effects, especially the production by a single gene of several distinct and seemingly unrelated phenotypic effects.

plei′o·tro′pic (plī′ə-trō′pĭk, -trŏp′ĭk) adj.

pleiotropy

[plī·ot′rəpē]
Etymology: Gk, pleion, more, trepein to turn
the production by a single gene of a complex of unrelated phenotypic effects. The effects may be a manifestation of a particular disorder, such as the cluster of symptoms in Marfan's syndrome; aortic aneurysm; dislocation of the optic lens; skeletal deformities; and arachnodactyly, any or all of which may be present. pleiotropic, adj.

plei·ot·ro·py

, pleiotropia (plī-ot'rŏ-pē, -ō-trō'pē-ă)
Production by a single mutant gene of apparently unrelated multiple effects at the clinical or phenotypic level.
[pleio- + G. tropos, turning]

pleiotropism, pleiotropy

the production by a single gene of multiple phenotypic effects.
References in periodicals archive ?
From these analyses we are able to demonstrate the following for the antagonistic pleiotropy model.
They observed a negative genetic correlation between size and developmental time in the unmated males, a finding that is clearly inconsistent with what we would expect if there were antagonistic pleiotropy.
A problem with this scenario is that the antagonistic pleiotropy is necessary but not sufficient for maintenance of the balanced polymorphism; the conditions for its maintenance are quite stringent, especially when selection is weak (Maynard Smith 1966).
This possibility, however, does not exclude antagonistic pleiotropy (see below) as an important mechanism for the postponed senescence in the O populations.
However, it is difficult to distinguish between the various theories of the maintenance of genetic variation (mutation-selection balance, balancing selection, antagonistic pleiotropy, environmental heterozygosity) simply by using observations of trait means and variances.
The "general vigor" problem: can antagonistic pleiotropy be detected when genetic covariances are positive?
Negative mutational covariances involving pupa-to-adult viability suggest antagonistic pleiotropy of some of the mutations involved.
This Pgm allele or an allele at a linked locus appears to be subject to antagonistic pleiotropy, since it is favorable for reproduction at early ages but relatively deleterious for reproduction at late ages.
In the present study, we also found positive genetic correlations between age and size at first reproduction, suggesting that antagonistic pleiotropy may constrain life-history evolution.
Our results do imply that tradeoffs due to underlying antagonistic pleiotropy affecting intrinsic growth, development, survivorship, and reproduction are not necessary constraints to life-history evolution.
Rose (1982, 1985) discussed the role of antagonistic pleiotropy in promoting stable polymorphism through heterozygote advantage.
However, no study to date has demonstrated a strong trade-off for host utilization which can be assigned with reasonable certainty to antagonistic pleiotropy.