anonymised

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anonymised

Personal data that have been processed so as to make it impossible to know the person with whom the data are associated. Anonymisation of data is especially important for the secondary (non-trial-relate) use of personal health data.
References in periodicals archive ?
This suggested approach includes (i) allowing anonymization websites that are aimed at circumventing government censorship to operate with minimal U.
A concluding section examines issues of anonymization and security, and offers case studies for further understanding.
The report calls for three solutions: applying anonymization techniques so that commercial data-miners can share information with authorities without disclosing the identity of individuals or supplying information of non-suspects; building authorization requirements into government systems for viewing data to ensure that only those who need to see the data do; building audit logs into the computing system to identify and track inappropriate access to information and misuses of information.
In many pharmacogenomics studies, anonymization of samples defeats the purpose of drawing associations between drug response and populations.
By employing advanced data security and anonymization strategies and pooling multiple studies associated with the same diagnosis, Project Data Sphere addresses both the legal and technical issues associated with sharing these kinds of data.
Emotient is the only company in the world with a patent that allows the anonymization of images before we have extracted emotions, not merely after.
Invitation to tender: procurement software solutions for anonymization database
improve anonymization techniques that reduce consumer risk of
465) However, because regulationists are unwilling to accept even complete anonymization, it is unlikely that coding would be permitted as a viable solution.
Key issues such as Data Anonymization are addressed along with the benefits and potential pitfalls.
Your question raises the issue whether the application of some form of anonymization process to personal data can be considered sufficient to avoid any negative consequence for the individual concerned--and, behind this, whether data protection rules apply.
Control samples were collected from 215 men without BTHS (random extract of male hospital population) according to the institutional guidelines for sampling, including anonymization.