electrode

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Related to Anode and cathode: electrolysis

electrode

 [e-lek´trōd]
either of two terminals of an electrically conducting system or cell; specifically, the uninsulated portion of a lead that is in direct contact with the body.
active electrode therapeutic electrode.
calomel electrode one capable of both collecting and giving up chloride ions in neutral or acidic aqueous media, consisting of mercury in contact with mercurous chloride; used as a reference electrode in pH measurements.
depolarizing electrode an electrode that has a resistance greater than that of the portion of the body enclosed in the circuit.
hydrogen electrode an electrode made by depositing platinum black on platinum and then allowing it to absorb hydrogen gas to saturation; used in determination of hydrogen ion concentration.
indifferent electrode one larger than a therapeutic electrode, dispersing electrical stimulation over a larger area.
point electrode an electrode having on one end a metallic point; used in applying current.
therapeutic electrode one smaller than an indifferent electrode, producing electrical stimulation in a concentrated area; called also active electrode.

e·lec·trode

(ē-lek'trōd),
1. Device to record one of the two extremities of an electric circuit; one of the two poles of an electric battery or of the end of the conductors connected thereto.
2. An electrical terminal specialized for a particular electrochemical reaction.
[electro- + G. hodos, way]

electrode

Cardiac pacing A part of an electric conductor through which a current enters or leaves; uninsulated conductive part of a pacing lead or a unipolar implantable pulse generator's casing which makes electrical contact with tissue; electrodes are used to record the electric activity of contracting muscles; electromyographic data is collected by surface electrodes, fine wire and needle electrodes. See Ring electrode, SilverBullet electrode, Tip electrode.

e·lec·trode

(ĕ-lek'trōd)
1. Device to record one of the two extremities of an electric circuit; one of the two poles of an electric battery or of the end of the conductors connected thereto.
2. An electrical terminal specialized for a particular electrochemical reaction.
[electro- + G. hodos, way]

Electrode

Medium for conducting an electrical current-in this case, platinum wires.

e·lec·trode

(ĕ-lek'trōd)
Device to record one of two extremities of an electric circuit; one of two poles of an electric battery or of the end of the conductors connected thereto.
[electro- + G. hodos, way]
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, an increase in both anode and cathode material was also examined.
However, the limiting current density values was increased as increased nozul flow rates, though the applied voltage between anode and cathode is constant (Fig.4 and 5) [2].
In the alkaline anode/acidic cathode acid-alkaline media configuration, both O[H.sup.-] and [H.sup.+] are consumed at the anode and cathode, respectively, at a rate of two for each molecule of formic acid.
The final variables investigated were the anode and cathode total operating pressures in a DPFC.
In the galvanic cell, voltage and current generated values by anode and cathode electrodes are an important parameter affecting corrosion.
A current of 200 mA/c[m.sup.2] is then forced through the cell for 6 seconds; during this process the cell voltage, resistance and anode and cathode C[O.sub.2] levels are recorded.
An external fixed resistance of 800 was connected with anode and cathode and by using copper wires, an electrical circuit was made.
Unlike traditional supercapacitors, which use the same material for both electrodes, the anode and cathode in an asymmetric supercapacitor are made up of different materials.
Although the applied voltage, initial pH, HCB concentration, electrolysis time, and the concentration of electrolyte all have effects on the removal rate of HCB, the materials employed as anode and cathode play an important role.
Anode and cathode electrodes are positioned on the channel walls opposite to each other and the mixing of fuel and oxidant in the channel occurs only by diffusion.