Freud

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Freud

 [froid]
Sigmund (1856–1939). Clinical neurologist and founder of psychoanalysis. Born in Freiberg in Moravia, and educated at the University of Vienna, he studied in Paris in 1885 under the neurologist J. M. Charcot, who encouraged him to investigate hysteria from a psychologic point of view. Freud stressed the existence of an unconscious that exerts a dynamic influence on consciousness, and was led to develop his method of “free association” in order to discover these buried memories. He emphasized the role of sexuality in the development of neurotic conditions, and published Interpretation of Dreams (1900), Psychopathology of Everyday Life (1901), and many more works. He was also director of the International Journal of Psychology. After fleeing the Nazi regime in Vienna in 1938, he died in London.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Freud

(froyd),
Sigmund, Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist, 1856-1939, founder of psychoanalysis. See: freudian, freudian fixation, freudian psychoanalysis, freudian slip, Freud theory.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Duchess of Cambridge during a visit to the Anna Freud Centre in London, where she opened the new Kantor Centre of Excellence
A Freudian explanation of Anna Freud's life is surely not out of place in this volume.
"I tell you this account of our seminar with Anna Freud," Bo wrote, "because it illustrates one reason that led, soon after 1963, to the precipitate decline of the intellectual influence of psychoanalytic thinking in America." Linking our Yale experience to something as substantial as the global fate of an intellectual movement might reflect some Yale-centrism, but why not?
In The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Volumes XVIII, translated from the German under the general editorship of James Strachey, in collaboration with Anna Freud, assisted by Alix Strachey and Alan Tyson.
Feeling herself wounded and lacking, the artist filters her emotional life through her forays in psychoanalytic theory: Melanie Klein, Anna Freud, Marie Bonaparte, and Otto Rank are just some of the figures who receive mention.
It includes multi-page entries on concepts like attachment, seduction theory, eugenics, andhysteria; individuals like Viktor Frankl, Anna Freud, Carl Jung, Erich Fromm, and Wilhelm Reich; and an entry each on five of Freud's works: Civilization and its Discontents, The Interpretation of Dreams, The Future of an Illusion, Moses and Monotheism, and Totem and Taboo.
But also, as with brothers in Freud's (1913) myth Totem and Taboo, siblings can act and adjudicate between themselves without vertical interference as is demonstrated by Anna Freud and Sophie Dann's (1951) path-breaking account of a quasi-sibling group of concentration camp children (The Lord of the Flies is its negative).
Bohm rounds out his mix of jazz history and world history with a pinch of his own profession, psychoanalysis, by bringing into the narrative such pioneers as Sigmund and Anna Freud and Wilhelm Reich, both Viennese, and the Englishman Ernest Jones.
This is an English translation of the work, first published in 1955, that was carried out by psychoanalyst Strachey with the assistance of Anna Freud, the daughter of Sigmund and an important psychoanalytic figure in her own right.