animal rights

(redirected from Animal-rights movement)
Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Encyclopedia.

animal rights

pl.n.
The right to humane treatment claimed on behalf of animals, especially the right to be treated as persons or more like persons under the law.
References in periodicals archive ?
I answer the following questions: What is specific in the Finnish version of the animal-rights movement? and what is its relation to other, more traditional Finnish civic activities?
The animal-rights movement regards the commercial exploitation of animals as "mass production": animals are increasingly only a means to promote economic growth.
The "supervalue" cherished by the animal-rights movement is the unjust treatment of animals.
The "principal enemy" of the movement is neoliberalism "running loose in our country with resounding success." (51) One of the most essential questions raised by the animal-rights movement and other new movements for change are those of "understanding and criticizing industrialization, questioning an instrumentalizing and dominating attitude." (52) One activist who has carried out illegal strikes has commented that "sabotage strikes are a direct answer to the contemporary economy-centered society, where everything is measured in money." (53) The intensive utilization of animals is, according the movement, an immediate consequence of economic greed.
When the animal-rights movement is seen as a part of a broader movement of change, the question is not one of a single-issue movement--not just one, separate problem.
(54) One can claim that the style of the animal-rights movement is an indication or a consequence of exacerbated social confrontations.
Hence, the question: From what has the animal-rights movement tried to break loose?
The animal-rights movement thus rejects belonging to the human race as the criterion for "personhood," or membership in our moral community, as a form of discrimination, comparable to racism or sexism.
In a 1995 interview on the Dennis Prager Show in Los Angeles, Newkirk admitted that the animal-rights movement is divided on the issue of abortion.
He said he disapproved of the violent tactics used by some animal-rights movements.