species

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species

 [spe´shēz]
a taxonomic category subordinate to a genus (or subgenus) and superior to a subspecies or variety; composed of individuals similar in certain morphologic and physiologic characteristics.
type species the original species from which the description of the genus is formulated.

spe·cies

, pl.

spe·cies

(spē'shēz), Avoid the mispronunciation spē'sēz. The singular and plural forms of this word are both species. Specie is not the singular of species. A species name begins with a lowercase letter and is printed in italic type: [Branhamella] catarrhalis, [Pneumocystis] jiroveci. When a species is unknown or not identified, the abbreviation sp., in roman type, is used: Rhizpus sp. (one unidentified species of Rhizopus), Bacteroides spp. (more than one unidentified species). Avoid slang abridgments of species names such as "H. flu" (Haemophilus influenzae).
1. A biologic division between the genus and a variety or the individual; a group of organisms that generally bear a close resemblance to one another in the more essential features of their organization, and breed effectively producing fertile progeny.
2. A class of pharmaceutical preparations consisting of a mixture of dried plants, not pulverized, but in sufficiently fine division to be conveniently used in the making of extemporaneous decoctions or infusions, as a tea.
[L. appearance, form, kind, fr. specio, to look at]

species

(spē′shēz, -sēz)
n. pl. species
1. Biology A group of closely related organisms that are very similar to each other and are usually capable of interbreeding and producing fertile offspring. The species is the fundamental category of taxonomic classification, ranking below a genus or subgenus. Species names are represented in binomial nomenclature by an uncapitalized Latin adjective or noun following a capitalized genus name, as in Ananas comosus, the pineapple, and Equus caballus, the horse.
2. Chemistry A set of atoms, molecules, ions, or other chemical entities that possess the same distinct characteristics with respect to a chemical process or measurement.

spe·cies

, pl. species (spē'shēz)
1. A biologic division between the genus and a variety or the individual; a group of organisms that generally bear a close resemblance to one another in the more essential features of their organization, and that breed effectively, producing fertile progeny.
2. A class of pharmaceutical preparations consisting of a mixture of dried plants, not pulverized, but in sufficiently fine division to be conveniently used in the making of extemporaneous decoctions or infusions, as a tea.
[L. appearance, form, kind, fr. specio, to look at]

species

the lowest (taxonomic) grouping of animals or plants which, at least potentially, forms an interbreeding array of populations unable to breed freely with other sorts of animal or plant. Thus members of a species have breeding compatibility and produce fertile offspring. The species is the only natural unit (taxon) of CLASSIFICATION. It is usually recognized on the basis of morphological characters (a MORPHOSPECIES), but different species can be morphologically identical (sibling species), for example, Drosophila pseudoobscura and D. persimilis exhibit behavioural differences leading to REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION. see BINOMIAL NOMENCLATURE. For asexually reproducing organisms, such as bacteria, a precise definition of species has not been universally formulated and agreed. Generally individuals displaying a high degree of similarity based on biochemical, genetic and morphological characteristics, for example, are grouped as species.
References in periodicals archive ?
Intake of CP presented a significant interaction between fodders and animal species (Table 2).
Today nearly 5,500 animal species are known to be threatened with extinction.
However, the agency indicated the data would be more helpful in tracking antibiotic use -- and possible antibiotic resistance -- if they detailed, for example, how much antibiotic was used in the production of each food animal species. According to industry sources, few if any companies maintain such information, and acquiring and maintaining it would be unduly costly.
Unlike Art Spiegelman's Maus, in which oppressed and oppressor are signified by specific animal species (Jews are mice, Nazis cats), Griffin's art relies on ambiguity; only the suggested narrative situation determines who is villain or victim.
In the work that we and our partners undertake to conserve and recover vulnerable species, awareness of the efforts we take for native plants is often overshadowed by the interest received by animal species. Too often overlooked is the fact that plants provide the foundation upon which animal life, including our own, depends.
The site contains images of museum specimens, scientific drawings, and field photos of the plant and animal species observed by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, along with journal excerpts, historical notes, and references for many of these examples as well as the date and location of observation.
The preserve protects vernal pools, which support one of the area's rarest species, the San Diego fairy shrimp, and is home to more than 65 plant and animal species, including 18 highly sensitive species.
The habitats are being threatened by intensive farming and the construction of a cross-border industrial site.The Habitats Directive requires that Member States prohibit the deterioration or destruction of breeding sites or resting places of a number of animal species of European conservation concern, including Cricetus cricetus, which has been suffering a severe decline in recent years across Central Europe due to intensive farming and other pressures.
Once fully in place, this network should ensure that the best examples of the Community's important natural habitats as well as the habitats of important plant and animal species are properly conserved and protected.
Formed by volcanic activity thousands of years ago, this park is home to more than 80 rare or endangered plant and animal species.
In fact, only 14 large animal species have been successfully domesticated--all but one of them thousands of years ago in Eurasia.
We are all aware of the disastrous way in which the world's plant and animal species are declining, and that by causing extinction on a massive scale we are depriving ourselves and our successors, not just of the wonders of nature, but of as yet unknown benefits to humankind.