physiology

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physiology

 [fiz″e-ol´o-je]
1. the science that treats of the functions of the living organism and its parts, and of the physical and chemical factors and processes involved.
2. the basic processes underlying the functioning of a species or class of organism, or any of its parts or processes.
cell physiology the scientific study of phenomena involved in cell growth and maintenance, self-regulation and division of cells, interactions between nucleus and cytoplasm, and general behavior of protoplasm.
morbid physiology (pathologic physiology) the study of disordered functions or of function in diseased tissues.

phys·i·ol·o·gy

(fiz'ē-ol'ŏ-jē),
The science concerned with the normal vital processes of animal and vegetable organisms, especially as to how things normally function in the living organism rather than to their anatomic structure, their biochemical composition, or how they are affected by drugs or disease.
[L. or G. physiologia, fr. G. physis, nature, + logos, study]

physiology

(fĭz′ē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The biological study of the functions of living organisms and their parts.
2. All the functions of a living organism or any of its parts.

phys′i·ol′o·gist n.

physiology

See Applied physiology, Cardiac electrophysiology, Clinical neurophysiology.

phys·i·ol·o·gy

(fiz'ē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The science concerned with the normal vital processes of animal and vegetable organisms, especially as to how things normally function in the living organism rather than as to their anatomic structure, their biochemical composition, or how they are affected by drugs or disease.
[L. or G. physiologia, fr. G. physis, nature, + logos, study]

physiology

The study of the functioning of living organisms, especially the human organism. Physiology includes BIOCHEMISTRY but this is such a large discipline that it is followed as a separate speciality. Together with ANATOMY and PATHOLOGY, physiology is the basis of medical science.

physiology

the study in animals, plants and microorganisms of those internal processes and functions associated with life.

phys·i·ol·o·gy

(fiz'ē-ol'ŏ-jē)
Science concerned with normal vital processes of organisms, especially as to how things normally function in living organism rather than to their anatomic structure.
[L. or G. physiologia, fr. G. physis, nature, + logos, study]
References in periodicals archive ?
These studies, published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology, Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition and the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, complement the more than 20 studies that support the role scFOS plays in helping to support immune health.
Tests had shown that animals suffered enormously during experiments to develop new drugs, and that animal physiology could not in any case be compared to human physiology, so such tests were useless.
During the 1993 mission, McArthur and his crew performed numerous medical experiments on themselves and 48 rats, NASA officials said, to expand the knowledge of human and animal physiology, both on earth and in space.
Education: Doctoral and master's degrees in animal physiology, University of Arizona, Tucson; bachelor's of science degree, medical technology, California State University, Sacramento
Contact: Gary Hausman, USDA-ARS Animal Physiology Research Unit, 950 College Station Rd., Athens, GA, 32604.
In 1989, he entered the graduate program in the Northwest Equine Reproduction Laboratory at the University of Idaho, where he received his PhD degree in animal physiology in 1992.
Bell, Encyclopedia Of Animal Science encompasses animal physiology; animal growth and development; animal behavior; animal reproduction and breeding; alternative approaches to animal maintenance; meat science and muscle biology; farmed animal welfare and bioethics; and food safety.
They can also alter animal physiology, particularly relating to the sexual organs.
In any serious discussion of the rich tradition of medieval bestiaries, of creatures fantastic and familiar as motifs in late medieval literature or art, or of the dawning of a modern awareness of human and animal physiology, there is no avoiding Albertus Magnus.
According to various experts in animal physiology, the suffering experienced by a fox if it is killed through 'lamping' is less than that caused by hunting.