comparative anatomy

(redirected from Animal morphology)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

anatomy

 [ah-nat´o-me]
the science dealing with the form and structure of living organisms.
Examples of specialty areas of anatomy and physiology. From Applegate, 2000.
clinical anatomy anatomy as applied to clinical practice.
comparative anatomy description and comparison of the form and structure of different animals.
developmental anatomy the field of embryology concerned with the changes that cells, tissues, organs, and the body as a whole undergo from a germ cell of each parent to the resulting offspring; it includes both prenatal and postnatal development.
gross anatomy (macroscopic anatomy) that dealing with structures visible with the unaided eye.
microscopic anatomy histology.
morbid anatomy (pathologic anatomy) anatomy of diseased tissues.
radiologic anatomy x-ray anatomy.
special anatomy anatomy devoted to study of particular organs or parts.
topographic anatomy that devoted to determination of relative positions of various body parts.
x-ray anatomy study of organs and tissues based on their visualization by x-rays in both living and dead bodies.

com·par·a·tive a·nat·o·my

the comparative study of animal structure with regard to homologous organs or parts.

com·par·a·tive a·nat·o·my

(kŏm-par'ă-tiv ă-nat'ŏ-mē)
The comparative study of animal structure with regard to homologous organs or parts.

comparative anatomy

The study of the similarities and differences between the body structure of different animals. Although external appearances may vary considerably, in many cases the similarities are much greater than the differences. This observation has been one of the principal reasons for the belief that we have evolved from common ancestors.
References in periodicals archive ?
These results will make ground breaking advances in our understanding of how the regulatory architecture of our genome was assembled during evolution, providing new insights on how RLs organization has impacted gene expression and, ultimately, evolution of animal morphology. By the execution of EVOREL innovative techniques and multi-disciplinary approaches to unveil the deep roots of the human regulatory architecture, I will start a promising research program that will secure my future career as an independent group leader.
Our study was conducted at the Histology Laboratory of the Department of Animal Morphology and Physiology and the Agricultural Entomology Laboratory in the Department of Agronomy at the Rural Federal University of Pernambuco (UFRPE).
*** Department of Animal Morphology and Physiology, Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil.