animal model

(redirected from Animal models)

an·i·mal mod·el

study in a population of laboratory animals that uses conditions in animals analogous to conditions of humans to simulate processes comparable with those that occur in human populations.

animal model

An animal that is an accidental or deliberate (though selective inbreeding) model of a human disease. Such models are experimental living systems that are used to study disease mechanisms and provide insight into possible therapies.

Animal models
• AIDS—SAIDS in macaque monkeys. 
• ALL—Immune deficient SCID mice. 
• Atherosclerosis—Watanabe rabbits. 
• Ceroid lipofuscinosis—Border collies.
• Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A—Pmp-22 mutant trembler-J mice.
• Congenital hyperbilirubinemia—Gunn rat enzymopathy.
• Congenital malignancy—Embryonal nephroma—pigs; hepatoblastoma—sheep; melanoma—darkly pigmented animals. 
• Crohn’s disease—Paratuberculosis/Johne’s disease, which affects dairy ruminants by Mycobacterium johnei.
• Cryptorchidism—dogs (castration).
• Cystinuria type I—Newfoundland dogs; Pebbles, a transgenic mouse model.
• Demyelination—Shiverer mouse.
• Diabetes insipidus—Brattleboro rats.
• Distichia—Cocker spaniels, dachshunds, bulldogs, Yorkshire terriers, poodles.
• End-organ resistance to normal hormones—Sebright bantam rooster.
• Endocardial fibrosis—Turkeys.
• Familial hypercholesterolaemia—Watanabe rabbits.
• Fibrosing alveolitis/Hamman-Rich disease—Bovine pulmonary disease. 
• GH-resistant dwarfism—Mini-mouse.
• Inherited giant platelet disorders—King Charles Spaniel dogs (Cavaliers).
• Kinky hair disease—Copper deficiency in sheep.
• Klinefelter syndrome—X-linked testicular feminisation in mice.
• Lymphocytic thyroiditis—Beagles, obese chickens, buffalo rats, primates.
• Lymphoma—Lymphosarcoma in dogs. 
• Malignant histiocytosis—Bernese Mountain dogs.
• Melanoma, spontaneously regressing—Sinclair swine.
• Mixed tumour (benign breast tumour)—Dogs.
• Muscular hypertrophy—Belgian blue cows.
• Myotonia congenita—Fainting goats.
• Neurolymphomatosis—Marek’s disease, induced by an oncogenic herpesvirus.
• Neuroplasticity—Aplysia, a marine mollusc.
• Osteopetrosis—Gray lethal mouse.
• Pacinian neurofibroma—Peking duck.
• Protothecosis—Collie dogs.
• Rheumatoid arthritis—Erysipelothrix-induced arthritis.
• Sleep apnea (obstructive)—English bulldog.
• Spermatocytic seminoma—old men and old dogs.
• Systemic lupus—NZB/NZW mice.
• Waardenburg syndrome—ferrets.

an·i·mal model

(an'i-măl mod'ĕl)
Study in a population of laboratory animals that uses conditions of animals analogous to conditions of humans to simulate processes comparable with those that occur in human populations.
References in periodicals archive ?
ARIUS' Trop-2 targeting antibody has demonstrated a significant anti-tumor effect in animal models of human pancreatic cancer, inhibiting tumor growth by up to 100 percent.
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MCT-175 successfully ameliorated the disease in animal models.
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Virginia's law says that students can choose to learn anatomy by other methods-such as virtual dissections or plastic animal models.
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Nonhuman primates are being used to study topical microbicides for the prevention of sexual transmission, but such a model has not yet been validated (ie, there is no "gold standard" to match any success against) and the development of other animal models may prove useful.
It carries information on such topics as genetics, cell signaling, cell cycle and DNA repair, diagnostics, apoptosis, animal models, antiogenesis, cancer therapy, and epidemiology and prevention.
In part because of biologists' growing capability to genetically engineer mice, the number of these animal models has exploded over the past decade.
The development of animal models for alcoholism began in the 1940s.
Three other Society-funded projects are also looking at animal models of MS.