animal

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Related to Animal Evolution: Human evolution

animal

 [an´ĭ-mal]
1. a living organism having sensation and the power of voluntary movement and requiring for its existence oxygen and organic food; animals comprise one of the five kingdoms in the most widely used classification of living organisms.
2. any member of the animal kingdom other than a human being.
3. of or pertaining to such an organism.
control animal an untreated animal otherwise identical in all respects to one that is used for purposes of experiment; used for checking results of treatment.

an·i·mal

(an'i-măl),
1. A living, sentient organism that has membranous cell walls, requires oxygen and organic foods, and is capable of voluntary movement, as distinguished from a plant or mineral.
2. One of the lower animal organisms as distinguished from humans.
[L.]

animal

(ăn′ə-məl)
n.
1. Any of numerous multicellular eukaryotic organisms of the kingdom Metazoa (or Animalia) that ingest food rather than manufacturing it themselves and are usually able to move about during at least part of their life cycle. Sponges, jellyfishes, flatworms, mollusks, arthropods, and vertebrates are animals.
2. An animal organism other than a human, especially a mammal.
Drug slang A regionally popular term for LSD
Pharmacology Any nonhuman animate being endowed with the power of voluntary action

animal

Pharmacology Any nonhuman animate being endowed with the power of voluntary action. See Cat, Cow, Dog, Fish, Horse, Monkey, Pig, Sentinel animal, Snake. Vox populi Etc.

an·i·mal

(an'i-măl)
1. A living, sentient organism that has membranous cell walls, requires oxygen and organic foods, and is capable of voluntary movement, as distinguished from a plant or mineral.
2. One of the lower animal organisms as distinguished from humans.
[L.]

animal

any member of the animal kingdom: organisms that are multicellular and eukaryotic which possess non-photosynthetic, wall-less cells. In some classifications, certain unicellular organisms such as PROTOZOANS are also included.

an·i·mal

(an'i-măl)
1. A living, sentient organism that has membranous cell walls, requires oxygen and organic foods, and is capable of voluntary movement, as distinguished from a plant or mineral.
2. One of the lower animal organisms as distinguished from humans.
[L.]
References in periodicals archive ?
In his team's new tree of animal evolution, comb jellies also diverge at the bottommost branch, below the sponges.
The team's analyses suggest that the bond may have developed early in animal evolution, sometime after the sponge and jellyfish lineages diverged.
According to a report by Brandeis University scientists in Nature, whenever a person chokes on acrid cigarette smoke or feels like he/she is burning up from a mouthful of wasabi-laced sushi, the response is triggered by a primordial chemical sensor conserved across some 500 million years of animal evolution.
A new analysis of ancient chemical fossils has rocked the cradle of early animal evolution, bumping back compelling evidence of animal life to at least 635 million years ago.
Working on rock samples from the Doushantuo Formation of South China, one of the oldest fossil beds and long viewed by paleontologists to be a window to early animal evolution, the research team is the first to show that Earth's early ocean chemistry during a large portion of the Ediacaran Period (635 - 551 million years ago) was far more complex than previously imagined.
After all, such innovations occur time and time again in animal evolution. The wings and teeth highlighted in these two books are accurately rendered and from a plethora of animals.
Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have discovered that these molecules are found in the exact same tissues in animals as diverse as sea anemones, worms, and humans, hinting at an early origin of these tissues in animal evolution.
The discovery challenges the prevailing view of animal evolution, in which genetic information is passed exclusively from parents to offspring.
Conventional wisdom has it that animal evolution began in the ocean, with animal life adapting much later in Earth history to terrestrial environments.
Researchers hypothesize that retrotransposons derived from viruses that infected cells early in animal evolution. Retrotransposons, also called jumping genes, duplicate themselves and insert the copies into random places in DNA.
These minimal eyes, called eyespots, resemble the 'proto-eyes' suggested by Charles Darwin as the first eyes to appear in animal evolution. They cannot form images but allow the animal to sense the direction of light.
"It suggested that much of the biology of insulin had been passed down in animal evolution from a common ancestor 550 million years ago," says Rulifson.