ammonia

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ammonia

 [ah-mo´nyah]
a colorless alkaline gas, NH3, with a pungent odor and acrid taste, and soluble in water.
ammonia N 13 ammonia in which a portion of the molecules are labeled with 13N; used in positron emission tomography of the cardiovascular system, brain, and liver.

am·mo·ni·a

(ă-mō'nē-ă),
A colorless volatile gas, NH3, highly soluble in water, capable of forming a weak base, which combines with acids to form ammonium compounds.
[fr. L. sal ammoniacus, salt of Amen (G. Ammōn), obtained near a temple of Amen in Libya]

ammonia

Biochemistry
An irritating, water-soluble, strongly basic, colourless gas, which is lighter than air.
 
Industry
Ammonia (NH3) is used in explosives, fertilisers, refrigerants and household cleaning solutions.
 
Physiology
NH3 is produced in the liver, intestine and kidneys as an end-product of protein metabolism; the liver converts ammonia into urea, which is then excreted by the kidneys; in liver disease this conversion is decreased, resulting in increased serum ammonia. Serial measurement of ammonia is used to follow progression of hepatic encephalopathy in Reye syndrome and other conditions.
 
Ref range
15–49 µg/dL.
 
Abnormal values
Increased hepatic coma, Reye syndrome, severe CHF, GI haemorrhage, erythroblastosis fetalis, drugs (e.g., diuretics and antibiotics).

ammonia

NH3 Physiology NH3 is produced in the liver, intestine, and kidneys as endproduct of protein metabolism; the liver converts ammonia into urea, which is then excreted by the kidneys; in liver disease this conversion is diminished, resulting in ↑ serum ammonia; serial measurement of ammonia is used to follow the progression of hepatic encephalopathy in Reye syndrome and other conditions Ref range 15-49 µg/dL Abnormal values ↑ Hepatic coma, Reye syndrome, severe CHF, GI hemorrhage, erythroblastosis fetalis, drugs–eg, diuretics and antibiotics. See Hepatic encephalopathy.

am·mo·nia

(NH3) (ă-mō'nē-ă)
A colorless volatile gas, NH3, highly soluble in water, capable of forming a weak base, which combines with acids to form ammonium compounds.
[fr. L. sal ammoniacus, salt of Amen (G. Ammōn), obtained near a temple of Amen in Libya]

ammonia

A substance produced when AMINO ACIDS are broken down. Ammonia is converted by the liver into urea and excreted in the urine. Urea can be broken down by bacterial enzymes to release ammonia. This may be a cause of nappy rash in babies.

ammonia

a colourless gas, which is the main form in which nitrogen is utilized in living cells. Formula: NH3.

am·mo·nia

(ă-mō'nē-ă)
A colorless volatile gas, NH3, highly soluble in water, capable of forming a weak base, which combines with acids to form ammonium compounds.
[fr. L. sal ammoniacus, salt of Amen (G. Ammōn), obtained near a temple of Amen in Libya]
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, the EPA ordered a company to upgrade its equipment and systems at three facilities after an anhydrous ammonia release at only one facility, costing the company over $100,000.
This contract is an extension of the current KRS applications for the state, which allow them to manage multiple licenses and registrations including their feed, fertilizer and anhydrous ammonia licensing and renewals.
Anhydrous ammonia is a colorless, highly irritating gas.
However, the combination of a tank of anhydrous ammonia connected to an on-demand ammonia dissociator is a surprisingly efficient energy storage and supply system.
And as it turns out, there is a large difference in [N.sub.2]O emissions between anhydrous ammonia and urea--at least in the corn cropping systems Venterea has been studying.
Currently, most of the anhydrous ammonia used in the area comes from Canada to a distribution center in Tokio near Spokane.
Natural gas is the primary input utilized to manufacture anhydrous ammonia and typically accounts for 80 percent to 90 percent of all input costs," says Francl.
Prominent ag products on the list include anhydrous ammonia, ammonium nitrate, acrolein, acetylene, difluroethane, ethane, ethylene, ethylene oxide, formaldehyde, hydrogen chloride, isobutane, isopentane, isopropylamine, propane and trinitrophenol.
Not only has the TVA been given all but a complete pass by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration in all these years--meaning that workers are exposed to unconscionable levels of friable asbestos, beryllium, arsenic, and other life-threatening substances--but upper management erected a large tank farm to hold tens of thousands of gallons of anhydrous ammonia. Despite warnings from lower-level employees familiar with the dangers of anhydrous ammonia, TVA management located these tanks within shooting range of a public road, and immediately adjacent to a TVA access road open to the public.
Agricultural theft rings are targeting any number of items, including ginseng in Michigan; timber in Alabama; irrigation valves in Washington; anhydrous ammonia fertilizer in Minnesota and Ohio; Japanese radishes in Hawaii; and nuts and citrus in California.
We also know that there are three main culprits: chlorine (used in the production of building materials); anhydrous ammonia (used for agricultural fertilizer); and, worst of all, hydrofluoric acid (used in transportation fuels.) There may be several plants using less common chemicals that are equally dangerous.
Due to aqua and anhydrous ammonia's hazardous and highly volatile nature, replacing it with urea can eliminate many concerns that go along with the transportation, transfer and safe storage of the large amounts of ammonia needed for power generation applications."