ammonia

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ammonia

 [ah-mo´nyah]
a colorless alkaline gas, NH3, with a pungent odor and acrid taste, and soluble in water.
ammonia N 13 ammonia in which a portion of the molecules are labeled with 13N; used in positron emission tomography of the cardiovascular system, brain, and liver.

am·mo·ni·a

(ă-mō'nē-ă),
A colorless volatile gas, NH3, highly soluble in water, capable of forming a weak base, which combines with acids to form ammonium compounds.
[fr. L. sal ammoniacus, salt of Amen (G. Ammōn), obtained near a temple of Amen in Libya]

ammonia

/am·mo·nia/ (ah-mōn´yah) a colorless alkaline gas with a pungent odor and acrid taste, NH3. Ammonia labeled with 13N is used in positron emission tomography of the cardiovascular system, brain, and liver.

ammonia (NH3)

[amō′nē·a/]
Etymology: Gk, ammoniakos, salt of Ammon, Egyptian god
a colorless pungent gas produced by the decomposition of nitrogenous organic matter. Some of its many uses are as a fertilizer, an aromatic stimulant, a detergent, and an emulsifier.

ammonia

Biochemistry
An irritating, water-soluble, strongly basic, colourless gas, which is lighter than air.
 
Industry
Ammonia (NH3) is used in explosives, fertilisers, refrigerants and household cleaning solutions.
 
Physiology
NH3 is produced in the liver, intestine and kidneys as an end-product of protein metabolism; the liver converts ammonia into urea, which is then excreted by the kidneys; in liver disease this conversion is decreased, resulting in increased serum ammonia. Serial measurement of ammonia is used to follow progression of hepatic encephalopathy in Reye syndrome and other conditions.
 
Ref range
15–49 µg/dL.
 
Abnormal values
Increased hepatic coma, Reye syndrome, severe CHF, GI haemorrhage, erythroblastosis fetalis, drugs (e.g., diuretics and antibiotics).

ammonia

NH3 Physiology NH3 is produced in the liver, intestine, and kidneys as endproduct of protein metabolism; the liver converts ammonia into urea, which is then excreted by the kidneys; in liver disease this conversion is diminished, resulting in ↑ serum ammonia; serial measurement of ammonia is used to follow the progression of hepatic encephalopathy in Reye syndrome and other conditions Ref range 15-49 µg/dL Abnormal values ↑ Hepatic coma, Reye syndrome, severe CHF, GI hemorrhage, erythroblastosis fetalis, drugs–eg, diuretics and antibiotics. See Hepatic encephalopathy.

am·mo·nia

(NH3) (ă-mō'nē-ă)
A colorless volatile gas, NH3, highly soluble in water, capable of forming a weak base, which combines with acids to form ammonium compounds.
[fr. L. sal ammoniacus, salt of Amen (G. Ammōn), obtained near a temple of Amen in Libya]

ammonia

A substance produced when AMINO ACIDS are broken down. Ammonia is converted by the liver into urea and excreted in the urine. Urea can be broken down by bacterial enzymes to release ammonia. This may be a cause of nappy rash in babies.

ammonia

a colourless gas, which is the main form in which nitrogen is utilized in living cells. Formula: NH3.

am·mo·nia

(ă-mō'nē-ă)
A colorless volatile gas, NH3, highly soluble in water, capable of forming a weak base, which combines with acids to form ammonium compounds.
[fr. L. sal ammoniacus, salt of Amen (G. Ammōn), obtained near a temple of Amen in Libya]

ammonia,

n a colorless aromatic gas consisting of nitrogen and hydrogen, produced by the decomposition of nitrogenous organic matter. Some of its many uses are as an aromatic stimulant, a detergent, and an emulsifier.
ammonia thiosulfate
n an ingredient of the photographic fixing solution that acts as a solvent for silver halides.

ammonia

a colorless alkaline gas, NH3, with a pungent odor and acrid taste, and highly soluble in water. See also ammonium.

blood ammonia
ammonia is a cerebrointoxicant and a high blood level causes a degenerative brain lesion. High blood levels of ammonia can occur in a number of diseases of the liver, in portacaval shunts, urea poisoning and liver dysfunction.
ammonia clearance
see ammonia tolerance test (below).
ammonia poisoning
ammonia gas may be released from artificial fertilizers or from decomposing manure and urine in slurry pits and silos and cause chronic poisoning manifested by conjunctivitis and coughing, sneezing and dyspnea. May cause dermatitis in animals bedded for long periods on deep litter. Acute poisoning causes heavy mortalities, as in urea poisoning. A secondary effect of chronic poisoning is hepatic encephalopathy. High ammonia content in water can cause deaths of fish, although additional factors such as high levels of suspended organic matter may be contributory.
ammonia pollution
of barn gases by production from fermentation of urine.
ammonia tolerance test (ATT)
assesses liver function and is particularly useful in detecting abnormalities of the hepatic portal vascular system. Blood ammonia levels are measured before and after the oral administration of ammonium chloride. See also portacaval shunt.
References in periodicals archive ?
Anhydrous ammonia, if present or used above quantities specified in the applicable regulations, triggers several right-to-know requirements under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA).
Thefts of anhydrous ammonia are common in McLennan County, where burglars siphon fertiliser from trailer tanks into five-gallon propane containers, says McLennan County Chief Deputy Sheriff Matt Cawthon, who took up the position in January.
This contract is an extension of the current KRS applications for the state, which allow them to manage multiple licenses and registrations including their feed, fertilizer and anhydrous ammonia licensing and renewals.
Anhydrous ammonia is a colorless, highly irritating gas.
2]O emissions between anhydrous ammonia and urea--at least in the corn cropping systems Venterea has been studying.
Currently, most of the anhydrous ammonia used in the area comes from Canada to a distribution center in Tokio near Spokane.
Natural gas is the primary input utilized to manufacture anhydrous ammonia and typically accounts for 80 percent to 90 percent of all input costs," says Francl.
Had the tank ruptured spewing thousands of gallons of anhydrous ammonia into the air, the evacuation zone would have stretched from the Massachusetts Turnpike north to Holden Center and from Shrewsbury west to Leicester.
A large release of anhydrous ammonia would not easily disperse.
Agricultural theft rings are targeting any number of items, including ginseng in Michigan; timber in Alabama; irrigation valves in Washington; anhydrous ammonia fertilizer in Minnesota and Ohio; Japanese radishes in Hawaii; and nuts and citrus in California.
We also know that there are three main culprits: chlorine (used in the production of building materials); anhydrous ammonia (used for agricultural fertilizer); and, worst of all, hydrofluoric acid (used in transportation fuels.
You can't just go in and apply anhydrous ammonia [a common nitrogen fertilizer] in the fall and take off for vacation.