ethnocentrism

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eth·no·cen·trism

(eth'nō-sen'trizm),
The tendency to evaluate other groups according to the values and standards of one's own ethnic group, especially with the conviction that one's own ethnic group is superior to the other groups.
[G. ethnos, race, tribe, + kentron, center of a circle]

eth·no·cen·trism

(eth'nō-sen'trizm)
The tendency to evaluate other groups according to the values and standards of one's own ethnic group, especially with the conviction that one's own ethnic group is superior to other groups.
[G. ethnos, race, tribe, + kentron, center of a circle]

eth·no·cen·trism

(eth'nō-sen'trizm)
Tendency to evaluate other ethnic groups according to values and standards of one's own, especially with conviction that one's own is superior to others.
[G. ethnos, race, tribe, + kentron, center of a circle]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Within the United Church itself, tolerance of diversity in culture and religion replaced the Anglocentrism which characterized nineteenth century evangelical missions.
Yet the traditional terms used to describe the conflict which engulfed Britain and Ireland during the 1640s, which include `Puritan Revolution', `English Revolution', and more recently `British Civil War(s)', tend to perpetuate this anglocentrism. None of these reflect the fact that the conflict originated in Scotland and Ireland and throughout the 1640s embraced all of the Smart kingdoms; or that, in addition to the war enjoying a pan-British and Irish dimension, each of the Stuart states experienced its own domestic civil wars.
Finally, no matter how hard I tried to resist my Anglocentrism, my favorite event came from the UK in the form of a sonorous new play by Philip Osment titled Flesh and Blood.
The genial omissions and false details our texts use to retail the Pilgrim legend promote Anglocentrism, which only handicaps us when dealing with all those whose culture is not Anglo.
"Good Girls, Bad Girls: Anglocentrism and Diversity in the Constitution of Contemporary Girlhood." All About the Girl: Culture, Power and Identity, edited by Anita Harris, Routledge, 2004, pp.
He simply does not conform to the assumptions of most of those who have sought to narrate the course of politics in post-Reformation England, and certainly not those self-styled revisionists who have, for reasons that frequently remain unclear, clung to a weird kind of anglocentrism in order to argue that we can describe the Reformation in England without referring very much to what was happening on the Continent.
(The World War II chapter continues this Anglocentrism, choosing Canada, the United States, Great Britain, and Australia as Allied nations to emphasize.)
Understanding the reasons behind an existing Anglocentrism in various sectors of the Indian culture, for instance Indian cinema, requires an examination of India's own relations with the colonial past as well as its negotiations with the current surge of white American cultural norms and practices, as they influence and inform the cultural psyche of the nation in this postcolonial moment.
This process, however, is too complicated to be explained simply, as Rushdie suggests, by Anglocentrism on Scott's part; rather, guilt, self-punishment, identification with, and ambiguity toward the lost object all arise as melancholic symptoms in the Raj Quartet by means of what Freud referred to as re-transcription, or nachtraglichkeit (see Khanna 15).
And with an articulate normative conception of the discipline, but no empirically grounded overview, researchers often made assumptions about the course of events from the British experience, applying the familiar periodization of British trade union development to Ireland, and searching for Irish comparisons with the myth of British labour's "forward march." Anglocentrism complimented a more popular and political view of labour history, which existed not as a narrative, but as a template into which the past was to be poured.
Although Jonson's poem now reads like a textbook case of Anglocentrism at its worst, it is important to remember how truly preposterous his words would have appeared in the international context of 1623.
The volume demonstrates how dramatically the perspectives of world history have changed from the Anglocentrism and Eurocentrism of the early twentieth century through the time of U.S.