ethnocentrism

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eth·no·cen·trism

(eth'nō-sen'trizm),
The tendency to evaluate other groups according to the values and standards of one's own ethnic group, especially with the conviction that one's own ethnic group is superior to the other groups.
[G. ethnos, race, tribe, + kentron, center of a circle]

ethnocentrism

[eth′nōsen′trizm]
Etymology: Gk, ethnos, nation, kentron, center
1 a belief in the inherent superiority of the "race" or group to which one belongs.
2 a proclivity to consider other ethnic groups in terms of one's own racial origins.

eth·no·cen·trism

(eth'nō-sen'trizm)
The tendency to evaluate other groups according to the values and standards of one's own ethnic group, especially with the conviction that one's own ethnic group is superior to other groups.
[G. ethnos, race, tribe, + kentron, center of a circle]

eth·no·cen·trism

(eth'nō-sen'trizm)
Tendency to evaluate other ethnic groups according to values and standards of one's own, especially with conviction that one's own is superior to others.
[G. ethnos, race, tribe, + kentron, center of a circle]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Although Jonson's poem now reads like a textbook case of Anglocentrism at its worst, it is important to remember how truly preposterous his words would have appeared in the international context of 1623.
The volume demonstrates how dramatically the perspectives of world history have changed from the Anglocentrism and Eurocentrism of the early twentieth century through the time of U.
The charge of anglocentrism has also been levelled against some of the historians most attuned to, and readiest to acknowledge, the interconnections between the politics of the various realms.
The place to start is with one of the many tensions existing within O'Malley's experience: his simultaneous Anglocentrism and Anglophobia.
Anglocentrism has generated myopic histories, but the wider-angled British lens is an optic of uncertain usefulness for many of this book's contributors.
In general, the collection does just that though, as editors Baker and Maley observe, English literary critics will inevitably exhibit the Anglocentrism that Canny finds objectionable in Pocock.
Yet if English here is made to appear as the language of sympathy and understanding, honesty and reason--in short, enlightened humanism--this somewhat naive anglocentrism on Matilda's part is undermined by the subsequent unfolding of the story.
Liberating the study of the British Empire from Anglocentrism, the OHBE offers new approaches that can help historians to explain one of the most influential historical phenomena of the last half-millenium.
To his great credit, Rodger breaks with a long tradition of writing which has equated British naval history with the history of the Royal Navy and, as far as events permit, he avoids narrow anglocentrism.
68) Yet, the history offered in this volume, like much which has been elevated to the status of a "New British history," offers, a revisionist interpretation of Britain with a fluctuation between inherent parochialism and an overarching anglocentrism.
In Eliot's critical revision of Anglocentrism through the representation of the othered woman in Daniel Deronda, the other is accorded iconic status.
In a novel critical of empire, multiple meanings not only chart a spiritual crisis among the English but provide a critique of their Anglocentrism, juxtaposing Christian revelation with Hindu truths.