ethnocentrism

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eth·no·cen·trism

(eth'nō-sen'trizm),
The tendency to evaluate other groups according to the values and standards of one's own ethnic group, especially with the conviction that one's own ethnic group is superior to the other groups.
[G. ethnos, race, tribe, + kentron, center of a circle]

ethnocentrism

[eth′nōsen′trizm]
Etymology: Gk, ethnos, nation, kentron, center
1 a belief in the inherent superiority of the "race" or group to which one belongs.
2 a proclivity to consider other ethnic groups in terms of one's own racial origins.

eth·no·cen·trism

(eth'nō-sen'trizm)
The tendency to evaluate other groups according to the values and standards of one's own ethnic group, especially with the conviction that one's own ethnic group is superior to other groups.
[G. ethnos, race, tribe, + kentron, center of a circle]

eth·no·cen·trism

(eth'nō-sen'trizm)
Tendency to evaluate other ethnic groups according to values and standards of one's own, especially with conviction that one's own is superior to others.
[G. ethnos, race, tribe, + kentron, center of a circle]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Foremost among a number of other novelistic ripostes to Lockhart's permeable model of Welshness, The Misfortunes of Elphin demonstrates how Welsh traditions of Welsh national history, and by extension a Welsh-born Welsh cultural identity, corrupts the supposed stability of the emerging Anglocentric British history and British identity that the Anglo-British were so invested in establishing.
Part II challenges dominant Anglocentric articulations of Baptist identity by delineating how that by 1800 the Baptist movement had come to "incorporate several independently generated traditions that had no connections to prior Baptist bodies" (53).
However, PW and Anglocentric did positively correlate with total CMS scores as expected indicating an overlapping of low psychological Africanity and disordered, broken psychological Africanity (as measured by the CMS).
The imperial and Anglocentric position of these three texts distinguishes them from later Waikato fiction for children, which is written from a postcolonial and New Zealand perspective.
It is from these anglocentric and colonial assumptions that McMaster can proceed to name the Asian as the 'other' and from there to say that his analysis 'confirms Asia as the 'other'; this clarifies the fear of invasion by 'the hordes of the north' and explains why these fears are periodically triggered by rhetoric or events' (2001, p.
This will not only make French history more relevant, but also balance a World history that all too often falls into the Anglocentric trap.
The news would be just as objective as the BBC/Ch4 (which admittedly aren't perfect, but are far too anglocentric - Welsh/Scottish stories are normally "fringe" ones, and never specific - stories happen in Wales, not the locality.
Part I gives an historical overview of Conrad's reception in Germany; Part II continues to expand the Anglocentric umbrella of modernism by asserting that modernist tendencies in Conrad's writings are caused by colonialism; and Part III focuses on nautical motifs to demonstrate how seafaring shapes Conrad's stories.
Of course a French or German reader would probably find Buchanan-Brown's monograph strongly anglocentric, though he makes an energetic attempt to show the movement of influences (and sometimes actual blocks and plates) across the Channel.
Again like Esty, she associates this midcentury shift with an Anglocentric inwardness.
Secrets of Nature (2001), represents the high point of recent scholarship devoted to the Rosicrucian movement, which has moved firmly away from the anglocentric thesis of Frances Yates, who saw John Dee as a prime mover behind the Rose Cross.
He shifts between linguistic universes, not just to move away from an Anglocentric understanding of American Jewish culture, but also to argue for different understanding of queerness and Jewishness in American Yiddish and English cultures.