angle closure glaucoma


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Acute Angle Closure Glaucoma

An abrupt block in the fluid circulation in the eye, resulting in increased intraocular/anterior chamber pressure and potential damage of the optic nerve and blindness which occurs when the intensity of iris bombé is sufficient to occlude the anterior chamber angle (ACA). AACG is more common in patients with preexisting narrowing of the ACA, which occurs in hypermetropes.
Clinical findings Sudden onset of blurred vision, severe ocular or facial pain, visual halos, nausea, vomiting, increased intraocular pressure, shallow anterior chamber, steamy cornea, fixed—nonreactive—dilated pupil, ciliary injection.
Management IV/oral acetazolamide, topical beta blockers, hyperosmotic agents, pilocarpine or reduce intraocular pressure; after intraocular pressure is decreased, peripheral iridectomy to establish a permanent communication between anterior and posterior chambers; if there is no response to medical management, emergency trabeculectomy, laser sclerostomy.

angle closure glaucoma

Acute angle closure glaucoma, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientific controversy to push the progress of glaucoma practice-inspiration by the debate on the classification of primary angle closure glaucoma (in Chinese).
The greatest danger lies in the possibility of sudden conversion to acute angle closure glaucoma. Laser iridotomy is definitive if the eye is otherwise normal and the angle not occludable by other mechanisms other than pupillary block.
Risk factors for acute angle closure glaucoma include older age, Asian descent, farsightedness, family history, and female sex.
We examined Central Corneal Thickness of 50 glaucomatous patients and the average CCT in both angle closure glaucoma and open angle glaucoma was less than 555 um.
All patients who attended Whipps Cross Hospital Eye Unit (part of the North East London Eye Partnership) between January 1991 and December 1994 with the diagnosis of primary acute angle closure glaucoma were identified from the casualty book.
Vessel density and structural measurements of optical coherence tomography in primary angle closure and primary angle closure glaucoma. Am J Ophthalmol.
Patients could be divided into four groups in our study: primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) (10/61; 16.4%), primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) (18/61; 29.5%), neovascular glaucoma (NVG) (29/61; 47.5%), and traumatic glaucoma (4/61; 6.6%).
Out of total of 151 patients who were diagnosed as glaucoma screened from various camps conducted all over the Punjab area, 149 (98.6%) patients had Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) and 2 (1.32%) patients had Primary Angle Closure Glaucoma (PACG) (Table 2).
It is estimated that more than 60.5 million people over the whole world are affected by glaucoma1, 47% of them live in Asia; a large majority with angle closure glaucoma. Glaucoma causes irreversible blindness and people are generally not aware of this serious disease2.
AbstractAcute angle closure glaucoma is a sight-threatening situation characterized by a sudden and marked rise in intraocular pressure (IOP) due to obstruction of aqueous humour outflow.