Angiostrongylus cantonensis

An·gi·o·stron·gy·lus can·ton·en·'sis

lungworm of rodents, a species transmitted by infected mollusks ingested by rodents; larvae develop in the brain and migrate to lungs, where the adult worms are found; thought to cause eosinophilic encephalomeningitis in humans in the Pacific basin; larvae have been removed from cerebrospinal fluid and the anterior chamber of the eye from people in Thailand who had eaten raw snails.

Angiostrongylus cantonensis

A filiform nematode for which rats are the definitive host; humans become infected by ingesting third-stage larvae in raw or poorly cooked intermediate hosts (e.g., snails, slugs) or transport hosts (e.g., freshwater prawns, frogs, fish and planarians), or by consuming fresh produce contaminated with either of the above hosts. A. cantonensis rarely infects humans, even in regions of endemic infection (e.g., Southeast Asia or the Pacific Basin; it is, nonetheless, the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis in humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Angiostrongyliasis has been recorded in many countries since the main species indicated as causative agents of human disease, Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Chen, 1935) and Angiostrongylus costaricensis Morera and Cespedes (1971) were described.
The parasitic worm that causes the disease is called Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The disease gets its name from the fact that the adult form of the parasite is found only in rodents.
The island apple snail can serve as an intermediate host for the rat lungworm nematode parasite Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Teem et al.
Mollusks presence in crops may also raise public health issues since several species can be naturally infected with helminths causing human diseases, such as Angiostrongylus costaricensis (Moreira & Cespedes, 1971), which causes abdominal angiostrongyliasis, and Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Chen, 1935), which is the etiological agent of eosinophilic meningitis (OHLWEILER et al., 2010).
Diseno de un programa de control y prevencion de Angiostrongylus cantonensis en el Ecuador periodo 2008-2009.
Concern is increasing about the spread of rat lungworm (Angiostrongylus cantonensis), especially in the southeastern United States (1-5).
Angiostrongyliasis is caused by infection and migration to the brain of larvae of the parasitic nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, or rat lungworm.
In some of the introduced areas, it was additionally associated with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis outbreaks, because it is an intermediate host of the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the parasite that causes this potentially fatal human disease (Lv et al., 2009).
Parasitology labs, particularly those in Hawaii and on the Pacific Coast, should be on heightened alert for queries concerning the rat lungworm parasite, Angiostrongylus cantonensis. This has become a serious problem because of the recent uptick in the population of this parasite's intermediate vector, the Southeast Asian semi-slug Parmarion martensi.