angiokeratoma

(redirected from Angiokeratomas)

angiokeratoma

 [an″je-o-ker″ah-to´mah]
a dermatosis marked by telangiectasia with secondary epithelial changes, including acanthosis and hyperkeratosis.
 Facial rash of angiokeratoma in a male with tuberous sclerosis. From Mueller and Young, 2001.
angiokeratoma cor´poris diffu´sum an inborn error of metabolism of glycolipids characterized by purpuric skin lesions (angiokeratomas); see also fabry's disease.

an·gi·o·ker·a·to·ma

(an'jē-ō-ker'ă-tō'mă),
A superficial, intradermal, capillary-acquired telangiectasis, with wartlike hyperkeratosis and acanthosis.
[angio- + G. keras, horn, + -ōma, tumor]

angiokeratoma

(ăn′jē-ō-kĕr′ə-tō′mə)
n.
An intradermal hemangioma covered by a wartlike thickening of the horny layer of the epidermis.

angiokeratoma

Any of a group of vascular ectasias of the papillary dermis, which may produce papillomatosis, acanthosis, and hyperkeratosis of the epidermis, which are more common in women (female:male ratio, 3:1) and on the leg. Of the 8 types, Mibelli described an angiokeratoma affecting the fingers and toes and Fabry reported angiokeratoma circumscriptum as a localised lesion on the leg or trunk. Angiokeratomas are clinically important because they clinically mimic melanoma.

an·gi·o·ker·a·to·ma

(an'jē-ō-ker-ă-tō'mă)
A superficial capillary telangiectasis, over which wartlike hyperkeratosis and acanthosis appear.
Synonym(s): telangiectatic wart.
[angio- + G. keras, horn, + -ōma, tumor]

an·gi·o·ker·a·to·ma

(an'jē-ō-ker-ă-tō'mă)
Superficial, intradermal, capillary-acquired telangiectasis, with hyperkeratosis and acanthosis.
[angio- + G. keras, horn, + -ōma, tumor]
References in periodicals archive ?
Early and progressive clinical symptoms include acroparesthesias, anhidrosis or hypohidrosis, angiokeratomas, gastrointestinal problems, and corneal dystrophy.
In classical form of FD with deficient activity of a-galactosidase A, acroparesthesias, angiokeratomas, hypohidrosis, hearing loss, and corneal dystrophy are presented in early childhood.
The main signs and symptoms of the disease are acroparesthesias in hands and feet, gastrointestinal disorders, angiokeratomas, dyshidrosis, intolerance to exercise and heat, hearing loss, arrhythmias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cerebrovascular accidents, and renal failure [5, 6].
Angiokeratomas are benign tumours characterized by ectasia of blood vessels in the papillary dermis associated with acanthosis and hyperkeratosis of the epidermis There are four widely recognized types; solitary angiokeratoma (oral cavities and lower limbs), Fordyce angiokeratoma (on the scrotum or vulva), Mibelli angiokeratoma (on the dorsal skin of fingers and the interdigital area) and angiokeratoma corporis diffusum (on the lower abdomen, genitals, hips and thighs) (1).
Main symptoms are gastrointestinal like postprandial diarrhea and abdominal pain, angiokeratomas, lymphedema, and hypohydrosis.
Angiokeratoma. Angiokeratomas are vascular tumours consisting of numerous ectatic blood vessels in the superficial dermis.
The main signs and symptoms of the disease are acroparesthesia in hands and feet, gastrointestinal disorders, angiokeratomas, dyshidrosis, intolerance to exercise and heat, hearing loss, arrhythmias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cerebrovascular accidents, and renal failure [5, 6].
Canine TE neoplasms is uncommon, but mastocytomas (HALLSTRO, 1970), hemangiomas (PEIFFER et al., 1978), hemangiossarcomas (LIAPIS & GENOVESE, 2004), angiokeratomas (GEORGE & SUMMERS, 1990), lymphomas {Hong, 2011, Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma of the third eyelid conjunctiva in a dog}(HONG et al., 2011) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (LAVACH & SNYDER, 1984) have been reported.
SOLITARY OR MULTIPLE ANGIOKERATOMAS: Usually one and occasionally several papular lesions arise in young adults, most commonly on the lower extremities.
Clinical manifestations of disease are hypohidrosis, acroparesthesias, heat intolerance, angiokeratomas, corneal opacities, cardiac arrhythmias, left ventricular hypertrophy, proteinuria, renal insufficiency and cerebrovascular accidents.
Angiokeratomas are characterized by asymptomatic hyperkeratotic vascular skin lesions characterized histologically by papillary dermal vascular ectasia and epidermal hyperkeratosis.1 Angiokeratoma corporis diffusum (ACD) is a variety of angiokeratoma where lesions are usually symmetrically distributed and mostly concentrated between the umbilicus and knees.2
Male patients were more likely affected by angiokeratomas (treated 91.7%/nontreated 71.5%), acroparesthesia (83.3% versus 50%) and tinnitus (66.6% versus 50%), or renal dysfunctions (58.3% versus 50%).