angiogenesis

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angiogenesis

 [an″je-o-jen´ĕ-sis]
1. development of blood vessels in the embryo.
2. any formation of new blood vessels; see also neovascularization (def. 2) and revascularization. Called also angiopoiesis and vasculogenesis. adj., adj angiogenic.
tumor angiogenesis the induction of the growth of blood vessels from surrounding tissue into a tumor by a diffusible protein factor released by the tumor cells.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·gi·o·gen·e·sis

(an'jē-ō-jen'ĕ-sis),
Development of new blood vessels.
Synonym(s): arteriogenesis
[angio- + G. genesis, production]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

angiogenesis

(ăn′jē-ō-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. angiogene·ses (-sēz′)
The formation of new blood vessels.

an′gi·o·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

angiogenesis

The development of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels. Angiogenesis plays a fundamental role in embryonic development, tissue and wound repair, resolution of inflammation, and onset of neoplasia. It is linked to an array of pathological conditions (e.g., cancer, diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

angiogenesis

The sprouting of new blood vessels and capillary beds from existing vessels, which plays a fundamental role in embryonic development, tissue and wound repair, resolution of inflammation, and onset of neoplasia; angiogenesis is linked to certain pathologies–eg, cancer, diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

an·gi·o·gen·e·sis

(an'jē-ō-jen'ĕ-sis)
1. Development of blood vessels in the embryo. 2. Any formation of new blood vessels.
[angio- + G. genesis, production]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

angiogenesis

The origination and development of new capillary blood vessels in normal or malignant tissue. Angiogenesis is necessary so that a growing or enlarging tissue, with its increasing metabolic needs, obtains an adequate blood supply providing oxygen, nutrients and waste drainage. Various angiogenetic factors are secreted by blood-deprived (ischaemic) cells and these operate on the inner lining (endothelium) of existing blood vessels to cause the budding out of new capillaries. Angiogenesis can be exploited in two ways in medicine-it can, in theory be inhibited in the treatment of CANCER, DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, obesity, ENDOMETRIOSIS and ATHEROSCLEROSIS; or it can be encouraged to treat heart attacks, ununited fractures, neurodegenerative disease, peripheral blood circulation deficiencies and baldness.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

angiogenesis

process of forming new blood vessels, normally accompanies the growth of MALIGNANT tissue. TUMOURS need angiogenesis to provide the nutrients and oxygen for development and METASTATIS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Angiogenesis

The formation of new blood vessels, for example, as a result of a tumor.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) 

A major protein involved in regulating the differentiation and proliferation of vascular endothelial cells thus promoting the growth of new blood vessels (angiogenesis). VEGF is essential for normal embryonic development and contributes to the maintenance and repair of tissues. There are several VEGF proteins, depending on the number of amino acids that they contain (e.g. VEGF 121, VEGF 165, VEGF 189 and VEGF 206). However, under certain circumstances (e.g. higher than normal levels of VEGF as happens in hypoxia) it may participate in cancerous processes, inflammatory processes (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis) and ocular neovascularization as in exudative (wet) age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Anti-VEGF drugs are used to inhibit the action of VEGF. See anti-VEGF drugs.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann