Anethum graveolens


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dill

,

Anethum graveolens

(trade name),

Oleum anethi

(trade name),

Peucedanum graveolens

(trade name),

dillweed

(trade name)

Classification

Therapeutic: sedative hypnotics
Oral: GI, kidney, and urinary tract diseasesinsomnia

Action

Dill seed has antibacterial, sedative, and diuretic effects. Dill seed oil has spasmolytic effects on smooth muscle.

Therapeutic effects

Improved sleep.
Relief of intestinal discomfort.

Pharmacokinetics

Absorption: Unknown.
Distribution: Unknown.
Metabolism and Excretion: Unknown.
Half-life: Unknown.

Time/action profile

ROUTEONSETPEAKDURATION
POunknownunknownunknown

Contraindications/Precautions

Contraindicated in: Allergy to dill or allergy to carrot family plants, including asafoetida, caraway, celery, coriander and fennel;.
Use Cautiously in: Obstetric: Pregnancy and lactation: avoid amounts greater than seasoning quantities.

Adverse Reactions/Side Effects

Dermatologic

  • contact dermatitis

Interactions

May ↑ lithium levels.None known.
Oral (Adults) Dried seeds—1–4 g PO TID; Oil—2–6 drops daily.

Availability

Bulk dried seeds: OTC
Dill oil: OTC

Nursing implications

Nursing assessment

  • Assess appetite, flatulence and bowel elimination before and during therapy.
  • Assess sleep patterns prior to and during therapy.

Potential Nursing Diagnoses

 (Indications)
Deficient knowledge, related to medication regimen

Implementation

  • May be taken without regard for food.

Patient/Family Teaching

  • Inform patients that there are no approved uses for this herbal supplement.
  • Advise patient that dill contains a high sodium content and patients on a restricted sodium diet should not take this herbal supplement without consulting health care professional.
  • Warn patients that skin contact with this herbal supplement may cause skin irritation.

Evaluation/Desired Outcomes

  • Improved appetite and reduction in intestinal discomfort.
  • Improvement in sleep habits.

dill

Herbal medicine
A culinary and medicinal plant that has been used as an antimicrobial, appetite stimulant, carminative and treatment for colic.

Anethum graveolens,

n See dill.
References in periodicals archive ?
reported that aqueous extract of Anethum graveolens significantly reduced blood glucose levels in diabetic mice.
Haematological and hypoglycemic potential Anethum graveolens seeds extract in normal and diabetic Swiss albino mice.
The results of animal mating revealed that treatment of female rats with Anethum graveolens aqueous extracts delays the fertilization process.
It is concluded that Anethum graveolens seed aqueous extract both in low dose and high dose increased estrous cycle duration and progesterone concentration and induced infertility without any significant adverse effects on oocytes' developmental potential such as structural and chemical changes.
The seeds of Anethum graveolens were purchased from local market of Lahore.
The essential oil was extracted from the seeds of Anethum graveolens L.
We could not calculate [chi square] for Rosmarinus officinalis and Anethum graveolens because of 100% repellency.
Laboratory tests with seed of Calendula officinalis and Anethum graveolens to describe morphology and anatomy components such as humidity content in balance (CHB) in different atmospheres to get appropriate conservation of the germsplasm to determine physiological behavior in short seed storage to evaluate and to stablish an appropriate methodology for germination, were carried out.
The seeds of medicinal plants were Plantago sp, Alyssum spp, Portulaca oleracea, Sesamum indicum, Origanum majorana, Trigonella foenum, Anethum graveolens, Melilotus officinalis, Trachyspermum ammi, Cuminum cyminum, Lactuca sativa and Lallemantia royleana that collected from medical fields.
21] on Pimpinella anisum, Malhotra and Vashishtha [17] on Anethum graveolens and Ghorbani et al.
4%) used for treating fold growth hair; Ceratonia siliqua (2%) used for treating constipation; Anchusa strigosa with value (12%), Anethum graveolens (6%), Allium ampeloprasum (3%), Coriandrum sativum (1%) are plant species mentioned as wild edible plants.
III-4: The response of Anethum graveolens to bio-fertilizers, nitrogen fertilizers and their interaction was evaluated.