dill

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Related to Anethum: Anethum foeniculum

dill

,

Anethum graveolens

(trade name),

Oleum anethi

(trade name),

Peucedanum graveolens

(trade name),

dillweed

(trade name)

Classification

Therapeutic: sedative hypnotics
Oral: GI, kidney, and urinary tract diseasesinsomnia

Action

Dill seed has antibacterial, sedative, and diuretic effects. Dill seed oil has spasmolytic effects on smooth muscle.

Therapeutic effects

Improved sleep.
Relief of intestinal discomfort.

Pharmacokinetics

Absorption: Unknown.
Distribution: Unknown.
Metabolism and Excretion: Unknown.
Half-life: Unknown.

Time/action profile

ROUTEONSETPEAKDURATION
POunknownunknownunknown

Contraindications/Precautions

Contraindicated in: Allergy to dill or allergy to carrot family plants, including asafoetida, caraway, celery, coriander and fennel;.
Use Cautiously in: Obstetric: Pregnancy and lactation: avoid amounts greater than seasoning quantities.

Adverse Reactions/Side Effects

Dermatologic

  • contact dermatitis

Interactions

May ↑ lithium levels.None known.
Oral (Adults) Dried seeds—1–4 g PO TID; Oil—2–6 drops daily.

Availability

Bulk dried seeds: OTC
Dill oil: OTC

Nursing implications

Nursing assessment

  • Assess appetite, flatulence and bowel elimination before and during therapy.
  • Assess sleep patterns prior to and during therapy.

Potential Nursing Diagnoses

 (Indications)
Deficient knowledge, related to medication regimen

Implementation

  • May be taken without regard for food.

Patient/Family Teaching

  • Inform patients that there are no approved uses for this herbal supplement.
  • Advise patient that dill contains a high sodium content and patients on a restricted sodium diet should not take this herbal supplement without consulting health care professional.
  • Warn patients that skin contact with this herbal supplement may cause skin irritation.

Evaluation/Desired Outcomes

  • Improved appetite and reduction in intestinal discomfort.
  • Improvement in sleep habits.

dill

Herbal medicine
A culinary and medicinal plant that has been used as an antimicrobial, appetite stimulant, carminative and treatment for colic.

dill

(dĭl)
A hardy annual, Anethum graveolens, whose leaves and seeds are used primarily to flavor foods. It is also used as an antiflatulent and antispasmodic, but scientific evidence of its effectiveness is lacking.

Patient discussion about dill

Q. i have nerv damage in my left arm . what are the best ways to dill whith paine excelpt paine pills. not the best speller hope pepole understand. just wonderd what typs of ways you can deal with for paine whithout haveing to take meds; terry

A. here is an article i found for you-

http://www.webmd.com/pain-management/guide/pain-relief-without-pills

"If you're a pain sufferer, here's some good news: Plenty of options exist to ease aches, and many of them don't come in pill form."

More discussions about dill
References in periodicals archive ?
Plant growth regulators, adenine sulfate and carbohydrates regulate organogenesis and in vitro flowering of Anethum graveolens.
Our results are also reinforced by Rabeh and Aboraya [31] who reported that Anethum graveolens or fennel oil and their mixtures have a significant hepatoprotective effect against C[Cl.sub.4] induced liver toxicity.
Efeito do estresse hidrico na germinacao e no vigor de sementes de anis (Pimpinella anisum L.), funcho (Foeniculum vulgare Miller) e endro (Anethum graveolens L.) Revista Brasileira de Plantas Medicinais, Botucatu, v.10, n.2, p.68-74, 2008.
Six spice plant samples, namely, onion (Allium cepa), parsley (Petroselinum crispum) roots and leaves, celery (Apium graveolens) roots and leaves, and leaves of dill (Anethum graveolens), were subject to analysis for the total phenolic amount and the antioxidant activity assessed by DPPH scavenging.
[25, 26], Plantago sp L., Alyssum spp, Portulaca oleracea, Sesamum indicum, Origanum majorana, Trigonella foenum, Anethum graveolens, Melilotus officinalis, Trachyspermum ammi, Cuminum cyminum, Lactuca sativa and Lallemantia royleana [23, 24].
Flavonol glycosides of leaves and fruits of dill (Anethum graveolens L.).
Treatment of adult female rats with Anethum graveolens extracts did not affect body and reproductive organs' weight as seen in our previous studies in both male and female rats (8-12).
These results are also in agreement with that of Chaubey (2007) who evaluated fumigant toxicity of Anethum graveolens Nigella sativa and Trachyspermum ammi against T.