Anesthetic agents

Anesthetic agents

Medication or drugs that can be injected with a needle or rubbed onto and area to make it numb before a surgical procedure. Anesthesia drugs may also be given by mouth, breathed in as a gas, or injected into a vein or muscle to make a patient relaxed or unconscious.
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A recent case involved a 19-year-old man in sickle-cell crisis who underwent cholecystectomy, common duct exploration and liver biopsy.(13) The anesthesiologist testified that a number of anesthetic agents were administered preoperatively and intraoperatively.
Moreover, with most general anesthetic agents in use today, the traditional unpleasant side effects--postoperative nausea, vomiting, prolonged drowsiness or headache--are much less common.
After the inductions, groups S and D received sevoflurane (Sevo) and desflurane (Des) as inhaled anesthetic agents, respectively.
Both xylazine-ketamine and isoflurane proved to be suitable anesthetic agents for successful ovariohysterectomy in rabbits.
Cancer recurrence after surgery: direct and indirect effects of anesthetic agents. Int J Cancer 2012;130(6):1237-50.
Local anesthetic agents may be administered to relieve the pain during any injections.
Local anesthetic agents are widely being used in all aspects of surgical procedures whether it belongs to general surgery or dental surgery.
The final section addresses some general considerations, including reasons for desirability of regional rather than general anesthesia, toxicity of local anesthetic agents, analgosedation to relieve non-pain discomfort for the patient, technique to avoid nerve injury or infection, and how to perform continuous nerve blocks.
Once a patient has been appropriately screened for any potentially complicating factors, the risk of the anesthesia can be further mitigated by careful selection of anesthetic agents based upon the specific needs of the patient.
These techniques have been modified as new anesthetic agents and adjuvants prove their superiority against their predecessors.
The local anesthetic agents lidocaine and prilocaine are considered safe to administer to a pregnant patient (both are considered Category B drugs by the FDA) since they have not demonstrated any teratogenic effects in humans, even in doses far exceeding the maximum recommended daily dose.