androstenedione

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Related to Androstendione: DHEA, androstenediol

androstenedione

 [an″dro-stēn´de-ōn]
an androgen, C19H30O2, less potent than testosterone, secreted by the testis, ovary, and adrenal cortex.

an·dro·stene·di·one

(an'drō-stēn'dī-ōn),
Androstanedione with a double bond between C-4 and C-5; an androgenic steroid of weaker biologic potency than testosterone; secreted by the testis, ovary, and adrenal cortex.

androstenedione

(ăn′drə-stēn′dī′ōn)
n.
An unsaturated androgenic steroid, C19H26O2, that is secreted by the testis, ovary, and adrenal cortex and is a precursor of both androgens and estrogens. Until 2005, when its nonprescription sale and use became illegal in the United States, synthetic androstenedione was used as a dietary supplement to enhance athletic performance.

androstenedione

An androgenic steroid less potent than testosterone, which is produced by the adrenal cortex, ovary and testis and converted to estrone in fat and the liver; in men, overproduction of androstendione may cause feminisation.
 
Increased in
Cushing syndrome; ovarian, testicular or adrenocortical tumours; adrenal hyperplasia; polycystic ovary disease.

Decreased in
Hypogonadism, Addison’s disease.
 
Specimen
Serum.
 
Ref range
Women (premenopausal)—0.5–3 ng/mL; women (postmenopausal)—0.3-8 ng/mL; men—0.9–1.7 ng/mL.

androstenedione

An androgenic steroid, less potent than testosterone, which is produced by the adrenal cortex and gonads, and converted to estrone in fat and the liver; in ♂, overproduction of androstendione may cause feminization; androstenedione is ↑ in Cushing syndrome, ovarian, testicular, or adrenocortical tumors, adrenal hyperplasia, polycystic ovary disease; it is ↓ in hypogonadism, Addison's disease

an·dro·stene·di·one

(an'drō-stēn'dī-ōn)
An androgenic steroid of weaker biologic potency than testosterone; secreted by the testis, ovary, and the cortex of the suprarenal gland.
See also: performance enhancing drug

Androstenedione

Also called "andro," this hormone occurs naturally during the making of testosterone and estrogen.
Mentioned in: Anabolic Steroid Use

Patient discussion about androstenedione

Q. What is the difference between ADD and ADHD? My Son has been diagnosed with ADD. Is this the same as ADHD?

A. Here is the general description:
ADHD: Think of these types of children as the energizer bunnies in constant motion. They tend to move about excessively, fidgeting and squirming, and always into things. Remaining seated when expected to is often an impossible task.
ADD: Children with predominately inattentive behaviors, more commonly referred to as ADD, may act very differently. These are the “daydreamers.” They may appear spacey, forgetful, and distracted. They move from one activity to the next, never quite able to complete a task. Often times they begin a task without waiting for the directions and end up frustrated and uncertain. They may seem rather messy, careless and disorganized.

Q. Is there any connection between ADD and Autism? I refer to ADD, not ADHD

A. there is a theory that ADD and learning disabilities are a "continuum" up to Asperger syndrome and autism. due to similarities in brain function and symptoms. mind you- it's a theory.

Q. What is the difference between ADD and ADHD? I know that H stands for hyperactivity, but what does it mean by symptoms? does It have the same treatment?

A. They differ by ADHD kids tend to move around all the time (not like ADD who can sit but not listen), and they are more then careless. They tend to injure themselves over childhood. <br>I saw a nice video that explains about those disorders! <br><object width='425' height='355' id='FiveminPlayer'><param name='allowfullscreen' value='true'/><param name='movie' value='http://www.5min.com/Embeded/5538/'/><embed src='http://www.5min.com/Embeded/5538/' type='application/x-shockwave-flash' width='425' height='355' allowfullscreen='true'></embed></object>
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More discussions about androstenedione
References in periodicals archive ?
Endocrine responses to chronic Androstendione intake in 30- to 56-year--old men.
The aims of this investigation were to investigate the effects of (testosterone (T) and androstendione (AED)) in the presence of the anti-androgen, spironolactone (S), on Hep-2 cellular proliferation and damage after 24, 48, and 72 hours.
So can elevated androstendione, a hormone secreted by the adrenal glands that has been linked to male pattern baldness.
Ginseng, Vitamin E, Zinc, Yohimbine, and over-the-counter male hormones such as androstendione and DHEA are thoroughly discussed.
In addition, blood samples were taken to measure testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin, androstendione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and the Free Androgen Index was reported.
The specific objectives of this study ere (i) to histopathologically evaluate the structural changes associated with sustained delivery of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and androstendione (AED) using adult male rats as a model, and (ii) to morphometrically evaluate the cortical areas and length upon the exposure of the aforementioned hormones for 90 days.