ancestor

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an·ces·tor

(an'ses-tōr),
A person in the direct line of descent from which a subject of interest is derived (for example, parents or grandparents; but no collaterals or descendants).

ancestor

(ăn′sĕs′tər)
n.
1. A person from whom one is descended, especially if more remote than a grandparent; a forebear.
2. Biology The actual or hypothetical organism or stock from which later kinds evolved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The label publishes the Kerbal Space Program franchise and will publish upcoming titles with renowned creative talent at studios including The Outer Worlds from Obsidian Entertainment, Ancestors: The Humankind Odyssey from Panache Digital Games, Disintegration from V1 Interactive, and more.
Among prominent ancestors is the Mijikenda prophetess Mepoho.
When Christians first came to Korea, the Catholics in the eighteenth century, they saw their religion as antithetical to Confucianism, and insisted that Christians should not do the ancestor ceremonies.
People offer 'pindadaan' to their deceased ancestors to pray for their souls.
It was also noted that Markle and Prince Harry are distant cousins through their mutual ancestor, High Sheriff of County Durham Ralph Bowes, according to (http://www.news.com.au/entertainment/celebrity-life/royals/meghan-markles-ancestral-tie-to-the-royal-family-dates-back-centuries/news-story/458838be8d1ee512bd269cc05c27ae5b) News.com.au.
Foor also explores interacting with human ancestors who may not be related by blood, such as ancestors of tradition or friends and mentors.
This is why, when discussing the complex issue of ancestors, which refers exclusively to dead persons--a fundamental aspect of indigenous African religions--Mbiti insists that they have nothing to do with worship.
"We deeply lament this immense desecration of our ancestors. The Allandale Station site and the burial grounds that are found there are sacred and must be protected," reads a press statement.
Sayers describes the history of ancestor worship in ancient India over a period of more than a thousand years, from the first millennium B.c.E.
Except for Oesterheld's thematic discussion of the role of ancestors in the Dayak-Madurese conflict, each essay focuses on a single people.
This book explores the religious and social significance of ancestors in the western and southern regions of Borneo, where ancestorship is important.