Anatomy Act 1832

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Anatomy Act 1832

An Act of UK Parliament which was created in response to
(1) the growing need for cadavers for teaching anatomy at medical schools and
(2) the Murder Act 1752, which limited anatomic dissection to the corpses of executed murderers.
The Act gave physicians, surgeons, and medical students legal access to corpses of people who had died in prison or workhouses, and allowed a person to donate his own or next of kin's corpse in exchange for a burial paid by the donee.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As the UK was the first country to appoint inspectors of anatomy under the Anatomy Act of 1832, [5] and since then has moved towards the appointment of the Human Tissue Authority, [4] this study draws comparisons between the UK and SA in this respect.
Before the Anatomy Act of 1832 expanded the legal supply of bodies, cadavers for dissection in medical schools were in short supply and grave robbing by "resurrectionists" became the main source.
The Anatomy Act of 1832 gave license to teachers of anatomy and medical students to dissect donated bodies.
MacDonald rightly argues that the Anatomy Act of 1832 (which was intended to regulate the provision of cadavers for schools of anatomy), was not enforced in the way it should have been.
Burke's trial was huge and helped trigger the writing of the legislation which would become the Anatomy Act of 1832.
The Anatomy Act of 1832 ended the practice, although the bodies of the destitute were still passed over to the anatomists for medical dissection.
It was only the Anatomy Act of 1832, which outlawed grave-robbing and restricted the legal supply of corpses to teaching hospitals and universities, that finally signalled the decline of private anatomy teaching in London.
Public outcry eventually led to the Anatomy Act of 1832, which authorised the use of deceased institutionalised paupers.