Anatomy Act 1832

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Anatomy Act 1832

An Act of UK Parliament which was created in response to
(1) the growing need for cadavers for teaching anatomy at medical schools and
(2) the Murder Act 1752, which limited anatomic dissection to the corpses of executed murderers.
The Act gave physicians, surgeons, and medical students legal access to corpses of people who had died in prison or workhouses, and allowed a person to donate his own or next of kin's corpse in exchange for a burial paid by the donee.
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As the UK was the first country to appoint inspectors of anatomy under the Anatomy Act of 1832, [5] and since then has moved towards the appointment of the Human Tissue Authority, [4] this study draws comparisons between the UK and SA in this respect.
The 1838 Anatomy Act allowing people to leave their bodies to science was the death blow.
The Anatomy Act, (2) provides for the supply of unclaimed bodies to teaching institutions and hospitals for the purpose of dissection and research work.
Possessing the Dead analyzes the contested implementation of the Act for regulating the Schools of Anatomy passed in London in 1832 (known as British Anatomy Act) and the subsequent Acts passed in Australia, such as the Tasmanian and South Australia Anatomy Act (passed, respectively, in 1869 and 1884).
1 The sources of cadaver for use in medical schools prior to the 1832 Second Anatomy Act in Great Britain, were through the use of murderer's bodies and grave-robbing (body-snatching).
The Anatomy Act 1832 was enacted to stop the obnoxious practices of the so-called "body snatchers" who raided graves for corpses and sold them to doctors, who used them in their research studies and experiments.
Under the terms of the first Anatomy Act, they had access to bodies from the workhouse and hospital wards that were not claimed by relatives or friends within forty-eight hours of death.
It replaced the Human Tissue Act 1961, the Anatomy Act 1984 and the Human Organ Transplants Act 1989.
Prior to the passing of the Anatomy Act in 1832 the only legal means to obtain bodies was from the gallows.
He said the government had authorised the officials and anatomy professors of hospitals attached to five medical colleges of Jaipur, Jodhpur, Bikaner, Ajmer and Udaipur for taking decisions on the unidentified bodies under the Rajasthan Anatomy Act, 1986.
For MacDonald there was an art to taking possession of the dead and this book provides the first in-depth study into how this was done: that is, how the Anatomy Act worked in England, Scotland, and Australia.