human

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factor IX (human)

AlphaNine SD, Immune VH (CA), Mononine

factor IX (recombinant)

BeneFix

factor IX complex

Bebulin VH, Defix (UK), Hipfix (UK), Octaplex (CA), Profilnine SD, Proplex T (heat-treated), Replenine (UK)

Pharmacologic class: Blood modifier

Therapeutic class: Antihemophilic

Pregnancy risk category C

Action

Converts fibrinogen to fibrin, increasing levels of clotting factors

Availability

Powder for injection: Various strengths; units specified on label

Indications and dosages

Factor IX deficiency (hemophilia B or Christmas disease); anticoagulant overdose

Adults and children: Dosage individualized; drug administered I.V. Use following equations to calculate approximate units needed:

Human product-1 unit/kg times body weight (in kg) times desired increase in factor IX level, expressed as percentage of normal

Recombinant product-1.2 units/kg times body weight (in kg) times desired increase in factor IX level, expressed as percentage of normal

Proplex T-0.5 unit/kg times body weight (in kg) times desired increase in factor IX level, expressed as percentage of normal

Off-label uses

• Hepatic dysfunction

• Esophagitis

• Unspecified GI hemorrhage (human product)

Contraindications

• Hypersensitivity to mouse or hamster protein (with BeneFix)

• Fibrinolysis

Precautions

Use cautiously in:

• recent surgery

• pregnant patients

• children younger than age 6 (safety and efficacy not established).

Administration

Give by slow I.V. infusion. Average infusion rate is 100 units (2 to 3 ml)/minute; don't exceed 10 ml/minute.

• If prescribed, administer hepatitis B vaccine before giving factor IX.

• Know that dosage is highly individualized according to degree of factor IX deficiency, patient's weight, and bleeding severity.

• Don't use glass syringe. Don't shake reconstituted solution or mix with other I.V. solutions.

Adverse reactions

CNS: light-headedness, paresthesia, headache

CV: blood pressure changes, thromboembolic reactions, myocardial infarction (MI)

EENT: allergic rhinitis

GI: nausea, vomiting

Hematologic: disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)

Respiratory: pulmonary embolism

Skin: rash, flushing, diaphoresis, pruritus, urticaria

Other: altered taste, fever, chills, burning sensation in jaw and skull, pain at I.V. injection site, hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis

Interactions

Drug-drug. Aminocaproic acid: increased risk of thrombosis

Patient monitoring

• Be aware that factor IX complex may transmit hepatitis.

• Closely monitor vital signs during infusion.

Observe for hemolytic reaction. If it occurs, stop infusion, flush line with saline solution, and notify prescriber immediately.

• Monitor I.V. injection site closely.

Monitor coagulation studies closely. Know that drug may cause thromboembolic disorders, including MI and DIC.

Patient teaching

• Inform patient that drug may transmit diseases.

Tell patient to immediately report signs and symptoms of hypersensitivity reaction, including rash, hives, tightness in chest, wheezing, shortness of breath, and swelling of throat or lips.

Advise patient to immediately report unusual bleeding or bruising.

• Caution patient to avoid activities that can cause injury.

• Tell patient to wear medical identification stating that he has a blood-clotting disorder.

• Instruct patient to notify surgeon or dentist of his blood-clotting disorder before surgery or invasive dental procedures.

• As appropriate, review all other significant and life-threatening adverse reactions and interactions, especially those related to the drugs mentioned above.

human

(hyo͞o′mən)
n.
A member of the primate genus Homo, especially a member of the species Homo sapiens, distinguished from other apes by a large brain and the capacity for speech.
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of humans: the course of human events; the human race.

hu′man·hood′ n.
hu′man·ness n.

Patient discussion about human

Q. I am a man with breast cancer. Hello friends, you might have heard about breast cancer in women but here I am a man with breast cancer. Is Herceptin licensed to treat me?

A. Hi, what were your symptoms and when did you discover you had breast cancer?

Q. what are the basics products we as a humans, need to have in our diet?

A. A regular healthy diet should be comprised of a 40-50% carbohydrate (bread, rice, etc.), 30-40% protein (dairy, meat, chicken, fish) and 20% fat. Other important ingredients are fruit and vegetables, that contain large amounts of fibers and vitamins.

Q. Is there a difference between a man's diet and a woman's diet? let say for the point of it the weight the same and they are in the same age .

A. no one should have the same exact diet, you need to find what works for you and helps you achieve your goals.

the base of the diet could be the same, for example burn calories then you consume. But other wise, find what works for you.

More discussions about human
References in periodicals archive ?
The result gave the scientists confidence to infer that contemporary African populations contain a small proportion of genetic material-about 2 percent-that moved from a species of archaic humans into the gene pool of anatomically modern humans about 35 thousand years ago.
A team led by Michael Hammer, an associate professor and research scientist with the UA's Arizona Research Labs, has provided evidence that anatomically modern humans were not so unique that they remained separate.
"We do not know whether Neanderthals developed the use of symbols independently or as a consequence of cultural contacts with anatomically modern humans," d'Errico told Science News.
The tools and ornaments in the Grotte du Renne look like those made by anatomically modern humans, so we might expect that they - not Neanderthals - were the artistes.
Either anatomically modern humans or Neandertals could have fashioned the Syrian tools, according to Holdaway.
Washington, January 27 (ANI): In a new research, scientists have determined that Neanderthals survived for several millennia after being replaced or assimilated by anatomically modern humans everywhere else in Europe, and the last of the species died out 37,000 years ago.
Related evidence comes from several African sites dated to more than 130,000 years ago, before the earliest skeletal evidence of anatomically modern humans, McBrearty adds.
"There is a problem with linking anatomically modern humans with behaviourally modern humans," said Professor Nick Barton of the University of Oxford UK, and one of the authors of the study.
A "late-origin" alternative holds that anatomically modern humans rapidly transformed communication with simple sounds and gestures into grammatical speech sometime between 50,000 and 100,000 years ago.
Age estimates based on a new analysis of fossil teeth found in three Israeli caves confirm reports that Neandertals and anatomically modern humans lived virtually side by side in the Middle East around 100,000 years ago, a team of scientists asserts in the May 20 NATURE.
According to a report in Discovery News, the site, called Pavlov VI, in the Czech Republic near the Austrian and Slovak Republic borders, provides a homespun look at the rich culture of some of Europe's first anatomically modern humans.