analogy

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analogy

 [ah-nal´o-je]
the quality of being analogous; resemblance or similarity in function or appearance, but not in origin or development.

analogy

/anal·o·gy/ (ah-nal´ah-je) the quality of being analogous; resemblance or similarity in function or appearance, but not in origin or development.

analogy

(ə-năl′ə-jē)
n. pl. analo·gies
Biology Correspondence in function or position between organs of dissimilar evolutionary origin or structure.

analogy

(a-nal'o-je) [Gr. analogos, analogy, proportion]
1. Likeness between similar features of two things, allowing a comparison.
2. In biology, similarity in function but difference in structure or origin.
See: homology
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies concerning analogical reasoning showed that students with greater executive-function skills (i.
For one, the analogical reasoning and in-class study seem to show that users can pick the correct patterns, but do not necessarily choose the correct pattern specifications.
Second Amendment originalism will need something more than analogical reasoning to produce a workable jurisprudence.
Matching functionally same relations: Implications for equivalence-equivalence as a model for analogical reasoning.
Heuristic and analogical reasoning operate on experience in different ways with different outcomes, and therefore may be more useful or effective in differing conditions.
The relationship between young children's analogical reasoning and mathematical learning.
It sets the terms of the process of analogical reasoning, a task at which lawyers and judges consider themselves relatively adept.
The second key idea of Bartha's articulation model of analogical reasoning is the principle of generalization, which means evaluating the prospects of generalizing the prior association.
Analogical reasoning as a mechanism in knowledge acquisition: A developmental perspective.
On the basis of the principle of systematicity, expert information analysts can identify opportunities of analogical reasoning more easily because they use abstract concepts to organize their knowledge.
This organization is designed with the following goals in mind: 1) allow students to develop the necessary inter-disciplinary communication and research skills to facilitate their design project work; 2) expose students to ideation and design skills that will encourage them to work outside of their comfort zone; 3) practice the analogical reasoning skills that facilitate the successful search for and application of relevant biological concepts.
Among specific topics are technological solutions for measuring and assessing the development of expertise, whether modeling can foster analogical reasoning, discovering and developing agent-based models for artificial life simulations, and designing and developing a performance model based on research studies about learning.