flashback

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flash·back

(flash'bak),
1. An involuntary recurrence of some aspect of a hallucinatory experience or perceptual distortion occurring some time after ingestion of the hallucinogen that produced the original effect and without subsequent ingestion of the substance.
2. In posttraumatic stress disorder (q.v.), the sensations resulting from strong emotional sequences acting as triggers.

flashback

(flăsh′băk′)
n.
a. Psychiatry A recurring, intensely vivid mental image of a past traumatic experience: soldiers who had flashbacks of the war.
b. An unexpected recurrence of the effects of a hallucinogenic drug long after its original use.
c. A vivid memory that arises spontaneously or is provoked by an experience.
d. An experience that has characteristics of an earlier experience.

flashback

a phenomenon experienced by persons who have taken a hallucinogenic drug or had psychological trauma and unexpectedly reexperience its effects. This is also suffered by patients with posttraumatic stress disorder.
Psychiatry A non-drug-related recurrent recollection of a traumatic event, frightening experience or image, as may affect ex-soldiers, e.g., Vietnam veterans; the recurrence of a past memory, feeling, or perception
Substance abuse An involuntary recurrence of some aspect of a hallucinatory experience or perceptual distortion often with negative overtones and accompanied by fear and anxiety; flashbacks are an adverse effect classically associated with psychedelic drugs—e.g., LSD and PCP—which occur days to weeks after the last dose; flashbacks are common in heavy users and disappear with time

flashback

Psychology A non-drug-related repetition of frightening experiences or images, which may affect ex-soldiers, as is well-described in veterans of the Vietnam conflict Substance abuse Hallucinogen persisting perception disorder an involuntary recurrence of some aspect of a hallucinatory experience or perceptual distortion often with negative overtones and accompanied by fear and anxiety; flashbacks are an adverse effect classically associated with psychedelic drugs–eg, LSD and PCP, which occur days to wks after the last dose; flashbacks are common in heavy users and disappear with time. See LSD, PCP.
Flashback-hallucinogen persisting perception disorder
A The re-experiencing, after discontinuating use of a hallucinogen, of 1+ perceptual symptoms experienced while intoxicated with the hallucinogen, eg geometric hallucinations, flashes of colors, macropsia, micropsia, etc
B Symptoms in A cause significant distress or impairment of social, occupational, or other important function
C Symptoms are not due to a general medical condition, or otherwise accounted for by another mental disorder
*DSM-IV American Psychiatric Association, Washington, DC 1994

flash·back

(flash'bak)
An involuntary recurrence of some aspect of a hallucinatory experience or perceptual distortion occurring some time after ingestion of the hallucinogen that produced the original effect and without subsequent ingestion of the substance.

Flashback

The re-emergence of a traumatic memory as a vivid recollection of sounds, images, and sensations associated with the trauma. The person having the flashback typically feels as if they are reliving the event. Flashbacks were first described by doctors treating combat veterans of World War I (1914–1918).
Mentioned in: Stockholm Syndrome
References in periodicals archive ?
Where Faulkner's use of prolepsis in the first section helps to widen the reader's understanding of the events of the unnarrated lynching, the analepsis that occurs in the second section effectively suppresses them as a means of inhabiting the perspective afforded the white deputy.
As Munro often does in her fiction, analepsis allows her to "postpone or withhold vital pieces of information that may confirm suspicions fuelled earlier" (Duncan 2011: 156).
No obstante, para explicar el efecto conseguido por las analepsis en Novela negra con argentinos, hemos de tener en cuenta ademas un tercer elemento ampliamente empleado en el cine negro a partir de la entrada en vigor del Codigo Hays: las elipsis.
20) Los conceptos de analepsis y prolepsis son postulados por Gerard Genette (1989) en su obra Figuras III.
Las analepsis son determinantes en los avances que basan su efectividad en el genero cinematografico, pues la repeticion que implica este tipo de anacronia (como recuperacion de acontecimientos pasados) situa la pelicula en un punto reconocible para el espectador a traves de la repeticion.
John Henry's own death in the final section is another example of analepsis, absent in the now of the narrative and told retrospectively, only available to Frankie through the narrative of Berenice, who nurses him through his meningitis:
Los alumnos mostraron que, a medida que avanzaba el Taller, cada vez empleaban mejor recursos narrativos tales como la analepsis (sub-objetivo 1.
Los antecedentes que se presentan a traves de analepsis (12) externas no nos dicen demasiado en primera instancia: solo se presenta muy brevemente al serrano cava (13) ("cava habia nacido y vivido en la sierra, estaba acostumbrado al invierno", 15) o da algunos datos sobre el colegio ("en anos anteriores, el invierno solo llegaba al dormitorio de los cadetes, colandose por los vidrios rotos y las rendijas", 15), que para el grado de conocimiento que tiene el lector en ese punto, aparece como informacion casi irrelevante.
No obstante, en la pagina siguiente el narrador retorna al presente de la narracion y va alternando presente y pasado, es decir, la anacronia recien mencionada constituye una analepsis narrativa, no actancial.
with an analepsis describing Emma's education prior to her marriage.
Analepsis is the dominant mode of Act I, consisting of flashbacks of Beane's early career and failures intercut with scenes of him arguing with scouts and strategizing with Peter Brand.
In addition to a syntactic use of ellipsis, the entire novel in its episodic structure engages with narrative anachrony, including ellipsis and analepsis.