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anal

 [a´nal]
relating to the anus.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·nal

(ā'năl),
Relating to the anus.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

anal

(ā′nəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or near the anus.
2. Psychology
a. Of or relating to the second stage of psychosexual development in psychoanalytic theory, roughly from ages one to three, during which gratification is derived from sensations associated with the anus and defecation. The anal stage is preceded by the oral stage and followed by the phallic stage.
b. Indicating personality traits considered by psychoanalytic theory to originate during the anal stage of development, especially anal-retentive traits.

a′nal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

anal

adjective Referring or pertaining to the anus.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·nal

(ā'năl)
Relating to the anus.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

anal

1. Relating to the anus, the controlled terminus of the digestive tract.
2. Concerning the putative stage of psychosexual development of the child in which pleasure is obtained from sensations associated with the anus. See FREUDIAN THEORY.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

anal

pertaining to the anus.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Patient discussion about anal

Q. Pulling pain in anus. Dear friends, I am 32. I feel a Pulling pain in anus sometimes while i finish passing stool and some times when i sit for long time. No bleeding so far. Is it a symptoms of piles? If so what can be done to cure it without going to doctor or operation. Please help me. This pain makes me to feel that i am very old.

A. horsechestnut is supposed to help...here is some info about it:
http://nccam.nih.gov/health/horsechestnut/index.htm#uses

but i wouldn't get my hopes high.

More discussions about anal
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References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, despite the recurved anal sac, Goniocrinus is considered the proper generic assignment because of few primibrachials, arm branching, and brachial shapes.
The anal sacs are two small "pouches" located at about eight and four o'clock around your dog's rectum.
Anal sac disease can occur alone or with any disease that brings anal-area irritation or inflammation--such as diarrhea, upset stomach or other gastrointestinal diseases that impact the firmness of stools.
Wobbles may have anal sacs that have filled with normal glandular secretions or the sacs may have become infected.
If your dog is having ongoing anal sac problems and you want or need to learn to empty them yourself, have your veterinarian show you how to do it.
The anal sacs are two small pouches located on either side of the anus at approximately four o'clock and eight o'clock positions.
"Every time an anal sac is expressed, there is a chance, small as it might be, that the mechanical manipulation will trigger an anal saculitis [inflammation], so I am in the camp of 'Don't squeeze it if it doesn't need it.'"
When good glands go bad, anal sac problems generally present as impaction, infection, or abscess.
"The secretions can become thicker than they should be, perhaps due to bacterial infection," he notes, "or a duct may be abnormally shaped or not as wide as it should be." Some breeds--poodles for example--seem to be more susceptible than others to anal sac problems; middle-aged and old dogs are at greater risk than younger dogs; and obese dogs are more likely to experience the condition than are animals whose proper weight has been maintained.
Most common inciting causes for this condition includes, fleas, lice, ticks, mites, hypersensitivity, anal sac diseases, swimming of densely haired dogs, dirty and unkempt coat and otitis (Medleau and Hnilica, 2006).
Technically, it's the anal gland that produces fluid and the anal sac that stores it, but most veterinarians refer to either or both when they mention anal glands or anal sacs.