anal fissure

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Related to Anal fissures: Crohn's disease, hemorrhoids, sitz bath, sentinel pile

fissure

 [fish´er]
1. a narrow slit or cleft, especially one of the deeper or more constant furrows separating the gyri of the brain.
2. a deep cleft in the surface of a tooth, usually due to imperfect fusion of the enamel of the adjoining dental lobes. It can be treated with a dental sealant to decrease risk of caries.
abdominal fissure a congenital cleft in the abdominal wall; see also gastroschisis and thoracoceloschisis. Called also celoschisis.
anal fissure (fissure in ano) a painful lineal ulcer at the margin of the anus.
anterior median fissure a longitudinal furrow along the midline of the ventral surface of the spinal cord and medulla oblongata.
fissure of Bichat transverse fissure (def. 2).
branchial fissure pharyngeal groove.
central fissure fissure of Rolando.
collateral fissure a longitudinal fissure on the inferior surface of the cerebral hemisphere between the fusiform gyrus and the hippocampal gyrus.
Henle's f's spaces filled with connective tissue between the muscular fibers of the heart.
hippocampal fissure one extending from the splenium of the corpus callosum almost to the tip of the temporal lobe; called also hippocampal sulcus.
longitudinal fissure the deep fissure between the two cerebral hemispheres.
palpebral fissure the longitudinal opening between the eyelids.
portal fissure porta hepatis.
posterior median fissure
1. a shallow vertical groove in the closed part of the medulla oblongata, continuous with the posterior median fissure of the spinal cord.
2. a shallow vertical groove dividing the spinal cord throughout its length in the midline posteriorly; called also posterior median sulcus.
presylvian fissure the anterior branch of the fissure of Sylvius.
pudendal fissure rima pudendi.
Rolando's fissure (fissure of Rolando) a groove running obliquely across the superolateral surface of a cerebral hemisphere, separating the frontal lobe from the parietal lobe. Called also central fissure and central sulcus.
fissure of round ligament one on the visceral surface of the liver, lodging the round ligament in the adult.
sylvian fissure (fissure of Sylvius) one extending laterally between the temporal and frontal lobes, and turning posteriorly between the temporal and parietal lobes.
transverse fissure
2. the transverse cerebral fissure between the diencephalon and the cerebral hemispheres; called also fissure of Bichat.
zygal fissure any of the fissures on the cerebral cortex that consist of two branches connected by a stem.

a·nal fis·sure

a crack or slit in the mucous membrane of the anus, very painful and difficult to heal.

a·nal fis·sure

(ā'năl fish'ŭr)
A crack or slit in the mucous membrane of the anus.

anal fissure

Sometimes called fissure-in-ano, this is a longitudinal tear in the wall of the anus, usually directly backwards. There is inevitable infection and a swollen skin tag, called a sentinel pile forms at the site. There is burning pain on defaecation. Surgical treatment is effective but about 10 per cent of patients suffer anal incontinence, mainly for flatus. BOTULINUM TOXIN has been used.

Anal fissure

An ulcer on the margin of the anus.
Mentioned in: Anoscopy
References in periodicals archive ?
Lateral internal sphincterotomy has been among the most gratifying surgical interventions for anal fissures but published literature has reported a 2.3% wound infection rate and 0 to 34% incidence of incontinence to flatus and liquid stool following this procedure.13
A randomized trial of glyceryl trinitrate ointment and nitroglycerin patch in healing of anal fissures. Int J Colorectal Dis 2000;15:243-245.
More focused interventions include cauterization of granulation tissue, application of nitroglycerin paste for anal fissures, trigger-point injections for pain relief, or estrogen application for atrophic vaginal tissue.
Anal fissure is a common, painful condition that causes significant morbidity, mostly in young adults.
Nitric acid More indicated in anal fissures as well as piles - very painful, sharp and splinter-like pain, lasting for hours after going to the toilet.
If it's bright red, it tends to be from problems closer to the anus such as hemorrhoids or anal fissures, which are really nothing more than cuts or cracks in and around the anal opening.
These complications include hemorrhoids caused by straining to have a bowel movement or anal fissures (tears in the skin around the anus) caused when hard stool stretches the sphincter muscle.
Analysis of disease distribution by gender showed that of the 206 male patients, 137 (66.5%) had pilonidal sinus, 22 (10.7%) had hemorrhoids, 34 (16.5%) had anal fistula, 11 (5.3%) had anal abscess, and 2 (1%) had anal fissure. Among the 36 female patients, 15 (41.7%) had pilonidal sinuses, 7 (19.4%) had hemorrhoidal disease, 7 (19.4%) had anal fistula, 3 (8.3%) had anal fissures, 2 (5.6%) had anal abscesses, and 2 (5.6%) had anal polyps (5.6%).
While studying the clinical presentations of anal fissures James G Petros et al [5] have found that pain, bleeding and pruritus were the commonest symptoms.
Patients included in this study were of three different diseases including third and fourth degree of hemorrhoids, anal fissures and low lying fistula in ano.