glycolysis

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glycolysis

 [gli-kol´ĭ-sis]
the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of glucose to lactate or pyruvate, resulting in energy stored in the form of ATP, as occurs in muscle. adj., adj glycolyt´ic.

gly·col·y·sis

(glī-kol'i-sis),
The energy-yielding conversion of d-glucose to lactic acid (instead of pyruvate oxidation products) in various tissues, notably muscle, when sufficient oxygen is not available (as in an emergency situation); because molecular oxygen is not consumed in the process, this is frequently referred to as "anaerobic glycolysis" Compare: Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway.
Synonym(s): glucolysis
[glyco- + G. lysis, a loosening]

glycolysis

/gly·col·y·sis/ (gli-kol´ĭ-sis) the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of glucose to the simpler compounds lactate or pyruvate, resulting in energy stored in the form of ATP, as occurs in muscle.glycolyt´ic

glycolysis

(glī-kŏl′ə-sĭs)
n.
A metabolic process that occurs in nearly all living cells in which glucose is converted in a series of steps to pyruvic acid and during which energy is released in the form of ATP.

gly′co·lyt′ic adj.

glycolysis

[glīkol′isis]
Etymology: Gk, glykys + lysis, loosening
a series of enzymatically catalyzed reactions by which glucose and other sugars are broken down to yield lactic acid (anaerobic glycolysis) or pyruvic acid (aerobic glycolysis). The breakdown releases energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Also called Embden-Meyerhof pathway. See also citric acid cycle, lactic acid.
enlarge picture
Aerobic glycolysis

gly·col·y·sis

(glī-kol'i-sis)
The energy-yielding conversion of d-glucose to lactic acid (instead of pyruvate oxidation products) in various tissues, notably muscle, when sufficient oxygen is not available; given that molecular oxygen is not consumed in the process, this is frequently referred to as "anaerobic glycolysis."
[glyco- + G. lysis, a loosening]

glycolysis

The breakdown of glucose or other sugars under the influence of enzymes, with the formation of lactic acid or pyruvic acid and the release of energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The complex biochemical sequence by which glucose-6-phosphate is converted to pyruvate and ATP.
Glycolysisclick for a larger image
Fig. 177 Glycolysis . The individual steps of glycolysis.

glycolysis

‘sugar-splitting’, the first stage of CELLULAR RESPIRATION, occurring with or without the presence of oxygen, in which glucose is converted to two molecules of pyruvic acid. See Fig. 177 . See also AEROBIC RESPIRATION.

Glycolysis

The pathway in which a cell breaks down glucose into energy.

glycolysis

a catabolic pathway that breaks down glucose 6-phosphate, derived from glucose or glycogen, and in the process generates energy which leads to production of ATP. In aerobic conditions, pyruvate is the end-product. In conditions when oxygen cannot be utilized anaerobic glycolysis involves the additional step of reducing pyruvate to lactate. See also aerobic exercise, anaerobic exercise.

glycolysis

anaerobic conversion of muscle glucose into lactic acid

gly·col·y·sis

(glī-kol'i-sis)
The energy-yielding conversion of glucose to lactic acid in various tissues, notably muscle, when sufficient oxygen is not available.
[glyco- + G. lysis, a loosening]

glycolysis (glīkol´isis),

n 1. the oxidation of glucose or glycogen by cytoplasmic enzymes of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway to pyruvate and lactate.
2. a series of enzymatically catalyzed reactions occurring within cells, by which glucose and other sugars are broken down to yield lactic acid or pyruvic acid, releasing energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate.

glycolysis

the enzymatic conversion of glucose to lactate or pyruvate, resulting in chemical bond energy stored in the form of ATP, as occurs in all tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
50 Mode of motor inactivity (M-IN), exercise mode with a dominant involvement of aerobic metabolism (M-AEM), mode of intense intermittent exercise (M-INTERM) and exercise mode with a dominant involvement of anaerobic metabolism (M-ANAEM).
Bangsbo (2003), Cometti (2002) informed that intermittent sports occurs actions in high velocity during important moments of the dispute in anaerobic metabolism alactic and after, occur short pause and long pause.
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Table 1 (3) shows us the approximate proportions of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism for several sports.
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The measurements, although laborious and time-consuming, were regarded as quantitative with respect to the severity of anaerobic metabolism and therefore predictive of the prognosis of patients with major impairment in the blood circulation, especially during the states of low blood flow of circulatory shock (1).
This change in rate of anaerobic metabolism takes place because of the need for extra adenosinetriphospate (ATP) for powering the increased muscle demands of exercise.
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A common belief is that a compromised circulation with exercise increases anaerobic metabolism, resulting in an increase in lactic acid production and a depletion of ATP and creatinine phosphate, leading to pain.
reuteri produces a non-peptide low-molecular-mass antimicrobial substance--reuterin--during the anaerobic metabolism of glycerol.