anaerobe

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Related to Anaerobes: Facultative anaerobes

anaerobe

 [an´er-ōb]
an organism that lives and grows in the absence of molecular oxygen.(See accompanying table.) adj., adj anaero´bic.
facultative anaerobe a microorganism that can live and grow with or without molecular oxygen.
obligate anaerobe an organism that can grow only in the complete absence of molecular oxygen.

an·aer·obe

(an'ār-ōb, an-ār'ōb),
A microorganism that can live and grow in the absence of dioxygen.
[G. an- priv. + aēr, air, + bios, life]

anaerobe

(ăn′ə-rōb′, ăn-âr′ōb′)
n.
An organism, such as a bacterium, that can live in the absence of free oxygen.

anaerobe

Any organism, usually a bacterium, capable of living without air. Anaerobic pathogens obtain their energy from fermentation; nonpathogenic anaerobes in nature obtain their energy from anaerobic respiration, in which nitrate or sulphate serve as electron acceptors.

The ropharynx, skin, colon and vagina harbor up to 1011 anaerobes/cm3; they are common causes of infection, and may be associated with aerobic flora in infections and abscesses of the oral cavity, upper respiratory tract, colon, genital tract, skin and brain; factors controlling anaerobes’ virulence are uncertain.
 
Management
Penicillin for supradiaphragmatic anaerobic infections; clindamycin, metronidazole, chloramphenicol or cephoxatin if the infection is below the diaphragm.

an·aer·obe

(an'ār-ōb)
A microorganism that can live and grow in the absence of oxygen.
[G. an- priv. + aēr, air, + bios, life]

anaerobe

an organism able to metabolize in the absence of free oxygen, obtaining energy from the breakdown of glucose in ANAEROBIC RESPIRATION. Some anaerobes are obligate, i.e. they can only survive in the absence of oxygen; examples are bacteria that cause food poisoning (see BOTULISM). Others (the majority) can live in either the presence or the absence of oxygen and are called facultative. When oxygen is present, respiration in these types is of the aerobic type involving the KREBS CYCLE to release maximum energy; when oxygen is absent they rely solely on energy released in anaerobic respiration.

Anaerobe

A type of bacterium that does not require air or oxygen to live. Anaerobic bacteria are frequent causes of lung abscess.

an·aer·obe

(an-ār'ōb)
A microorganism that can live and grow in the absence of oxygen.
[G. an- priv. + aēr, air, + bios, life]
References in periodicals archive ?
nucleatum serves as a bridge between noncoaggregating early (often aerobes) and late (often anaerobes) colonizers because it is capable of coaggregating with all species of oral bacteria [25, 26].
Analysis of adherence, biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity suggest a greater virulence potential of Gardnerella vaginalis relative to other bacterial vaginosis associated anaerobes. SGM journal 2010;156(2) :392-9.
* PGING AS 6422 (Anaerobe systems, INC, Morgan Hill, Cali) a selective medium for Porphyromonas gingivalis (PGING)
The average reduction observed for the streptococci load (56.4%) was more than that observed for the total bacteria (45.3%) and the anaerobes (51.7%).
Anaerobes were submitted from 165 patients (139 adults, 18 children, 8 unknown age); all 180 anaerobes were identified to species level, with B.
There are currently no automated methods for determining the susceptibility of anaerobes; however, three techniques are presently practiced and give reproducible results.
Other anaerobes were associated with increases in CVL HIV RNA concentrations, Jane Hitti, M.D., reported at the annual meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society for Obstetrics and Gynecology.
The vagina normally contains lots of "good" bacteria called lactobacilli plus a few other types of bacteria called anaerobes. Too many anaerobes can cause bacterial vaginosis, although health care professionals are not certain why the anaerobe bacteria overgrow and cause this infection.
A serum bottle modification of the Hungate technique for cultivating obligate anaerobes. Appl Environ Microbiol 27:985-987.
These findings add to previous data suggesting a pathogenic role of anaerobes in the acute inflammatory process in the tonsils.
Though the two are 97 percent identical, they are different enough from other anaerobes to warrant classification as members of a new genus.
* The bacteria are anaerobes and cannot multiply in most foods.