anabolism

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anabolism

 [ah-nab´o-lizm]
the constructive phase of metabolism, in which the body cells synthesize protoplasm for growth and repair; the opposite of catabolism. The manner in which this synthesis takes place is directed by the genetic code carried by the molecules of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The “building blocks” for this synthesis of protoplasm are obtained from amino acids and other nutritive elements in the diet. adj., adj anabol´ic.

a·nab·o·lism

(ă-nab'ō-lizm),
1. The building up in the body of complex chemical compounds from smaller simpler compounds (for example, proteins from amino acids), usually with the use of energy. Compare: catabolism, metabolism.
2. The sum of synthetic metabolic reactions.
[G. anabolē, a raising up]

anabolism

/anab·o·lism/ (ah-nab´o-lizm) the constructive process by which living cells convert simple substances into more complex compounds, especially into living matter.anabol´ic

anabolism

(ə-năb′ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
The phase of metabolism in which simple substances are synthesized into the complex materials of living tissue.

an′a·bol′ic (ăn′ə-bŏl′ĭk) adj.

anabolism

[ənab′əliz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, anaballein, to build up
the constructive phase of metabolism characterized by the conversion of simple substances into the more complex compounds of living matter. Compare catabolism. anabolic, adj.

a·nab·o·lism

(ă-nab'ŏ-lizm)
1. The building up in the body of complex chemical compounds from simpler compounds (e.g., proteins from amino acids), usually with the use of energy.
Compare: catabolism, metabolism
2. The sum of synthetic metabolic reactions.
[G. anabolē, a raising up]

anabolism

Building up of the tissues. The metabolic process by which the complex biochemical structure of living tissue is synthesized from simple nutritional elements such as sugars, amino acids and fatty acids. Contrast with CATABOLISM, which is the breakdown of complex tissues to simpler, consumable, substances. The term is derived from the Greek anabole , to build up or throw up.

anabolism

or

synthesis

a type of metabolism in which complex chemicals are synthesized from simpler building blocks, a process which is endergonic (i.e. requires energy). The classic example of an anabolic process is PHOTOSYNTHESIS in which solar energy is incorporated into complex compounds such as glucose and its derivatives. Animals also carry out many anabolic reactions, building up complex molecules such as proteins from simpler subunits (amino acids) obtained from heterotrophic nutrition (see HETEROTROPH). See CATABOLISM.

metabolism

continuous series of chemical processes in the living body by which life is maintained. Nutrients and tissues are broken down (catabolism), releasing energy which is utilized in the creation of new substances for growth and rebuilding (anabolism). metabolite any substance produced by a metabolic process. See also energy systems.

anabolism

energy-dependent process of assimilation of nutritive material and its conversion into living tissue (opposite: catabolism)

anabolism (·naˑ·b·liˈ·zm),

n constructive metabolism in which complex substances are synthesized from simple ones.

a·nab·o·lism

(ă-nab'ŏ-lizm)
The building up in the body of complex chemical compounds from smaller simpler compounds (e.g., proteins from amino acids), usually with the use of energy.
Compare: catabolism, metabolism
[G. anabolē, a raising up]

anabolism (ənab´əlizəm),

n the constructive process by which substances are converted from simple to complex forms by living cells; constructive metabolism.

anabolism

the constructive phase of metabolism, in which the body cells synthesize protoplasm for growth and repair.
The manner in which this synthesis takes place is directed by the genetic code carried by the molecules of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The 'building blocks' for this synthesis of protoplasm are obtained from amino acids and other nutritive elements in the diet.