amitriptyline

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amitriptyline

 [am″ĭ-trip´tĭ-lēn]
a tricyclic antidepressant with sedative effects; also used in treating enuresis, chronic pain, peptic ulcer, and bulimia nervosa.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

amitriptyline

(ăm′ĭ-trĭp′tə-lēn′)
n.
A tricyclic antidepressant drug, C20H23N, used in the form of its hydrochloride salt.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

amitriptyline

Elavil Neuropharmacology A tricyclic antidepressant, with sedative and anticholinergic properties, which may be used for peripheral neuropathy Adverse effects Rash, nausea, weight gain/loss, drowsiness, nervousness, insomnia, confusion, seizures, coma, orthostatic hypotension
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

amitriptyline

A tricyclic antidepressant drug. The drug is on the WHO official list. A brand name is Triptafen.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (e.g., fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine, and fluvoxamine) are now the recommended first-line medications in depressed children and adolescents due to better tolerance and fewer side effects than the tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amytriptyline, imipramine, desipramine) (Kutcher, 1997).
Similarly, research attention has been given to the effects of adrenergic antagonists (e.g., clorpromazine - Thorazine) in decreasing the frustrative response to nonreward and adrenergic agonists (e.g., amytriptyline HCl - Elavil) in enhancing this response.
trial of amytriptyline among depressed patients in general
Antidepressants such as amytriptyline (Elavil) are frequently used for pain, and gabapentin (Neurontin) is often used for pain and behavior control, although it is FDA-approved as a seizure medication.