amyloplast

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Related to Amyloplasts: chromoplasts

am·y·lo·plast

(am'i-lō-plast),
A granule in the protoplasm of a plant cell that is the center of a starch-forming process and starch storage.
Synonym(s): amylogenic body
[amylo- + G. plastos, formed]

amyloplast

a type of cell inclusion found in many plant tissues, particularly storage organs such as the potato tuber. Amyloplasts contain starch enclosed in a UNIT MEMBRANE, the whole structure being a type of LEUCOPLAST. Besides serving as a starch store, amyloplasts are thought by some scientists to function also as a gravity-seeking device, helping the roots to push through the soil in the correct direction (see GEOTROPISM).
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Inside the vegetative cell cytoplasm there can be found extensive cisterns of the ERr, numerous mitochondria and abundant amyloplasts. The former possesses a conspicuous nucleus and a reduced cytoplasm with scarce mitochondria and bodies with concentric intravacuolar membranes.
Amyloplasts in the starch-treated samples will be evident with Lugol's solution or with crossed Polaroids.
Name of Method Identifying Characteristics Potato Large egg-shaped amyloplasts. Visible unstained; black-purple with Lugol's solution; large, off- center Maltese cross with polarized light.
With respect to plastids, ripe pollen grains can be divided into two categories: with amyloplasts and with proplastids.
However, in some species amyloplasts are still able to divide during late pollen maturation, even though the pollen mitosis (es) is (are) achieved, This occurs when vegetative cell plastids of Lolium perenne or Lilium pollen store a starch grain at one pole and this is successively pinched off (Pacini et al., 1992a; Clement et al., 1996a).
When the first haploid mitosis occurs, plastids in the microspore can be proplastids or amyloplasts. If they enter the generative cell, they are always in the proplastid state (Pacini et al., l992a).
Amyloplasts are necessary for full gravitropic sensitivity in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.
The comparison of B73 and Mo17 inbred lines indicates that the physiological basis for increased tolerance to high temperature is associated with ability to protect endosperm cell ultrastructure and ultimately endosperm cell division and amyloplast initiation against the detrimental effects of high temperature during early kernel development.
The rice coleoptile is highly sensitive to gravity, and the abundance of amyloplasts can be controlled by submerged growth.
The data can be discussed in terms of a physical contact between amyloplasts and microtubules during gravity perception.
Cells appeared to be devoid of cellular components, specifically discernible nuclei, mitotic structures, and amyloplasts. This differed from the untreated seedling root cap (Fig.
Starch staining of the hypocotyl with I-KI solution shows almost an absence of amyloplast granules in the suppressors grown in sucrose free medium.