amphitheater

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amphitheater

(am″fĭ-thē′ă-tĕr) [ amphi- + theater]
An auditorium with tiers of seats around it for students and other observers.
References in periodicals archive ?
The height of the amphitheater's wall reaches up to about 22 meters and the amphitheater accommodates for more than 15 thousand people while the width of its stage reaches up to 45.5 meters.
The Amphitheater at Coney Island Boardwalk, the cornerstone of the state-of-the-art Seaside Park and Community Arts Center developed by iStar, in partnership with Coney Island USA, will have its grand opening in July 2016 bringing New York City a new outdoor live entertainment venue.
The Amphitheater is located on Coney Island's famed boardwalk and incorporates the Childs Building, built in 1923 as one of the first large-format stand-alone restaurants in the country.
Live Nation, a leading live entertainment company, will hold a long-term lease to operate the Amphitheater at Coney Island Boardwalk, including booking and promoting a full summer season of live music, comedy and family entertainment.
New York City Economic Development Corporation brokered the deal for the Amphitheater at Coney Island Boardwalk with iStar Financial and nonprofit Coney Island USA in 2014.
The City's $60 million investment in the project has supported the property acquisition, adaptive reuse of the Childs Building, the development of the Amphitheater, and the creation of 40,000 square feet of publicly-accessible landscaped open space.
A respectful dissent from the conclusions of John Russell Brown, particularly concerning act 4, scene 1, the scene in which the crazed Ferdinand offers the Duchess a dead man's hand, produces the quietly triumphant conclusion that "the steady, overall illumination of the amphitheaters and halls, far from imposing a restriction on the actors and playwrights, meant that even in scenes of pretended darkness, the audience could see and respond to the visual media of the actors' craft" (232).