Amphipoda

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Related to Amphipods: order Amphipoda

Amphipoda

an order of crustaceans that includes shrimps and sand hoppers.
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Freshwater amphipods, including those in the genus Crangonyx, are usually considered detritivorous (Schwartz 1992), but in certain conditions they have been documented to consume a variety of small organisms including zooplankton like Daphnia obtusa, aquatic insect larvae, and other crustaceans such as isopods (Hynes 1954; Schwartz 1992; MacNeil and others 1997).
Surprisingly, the researchers found carbon-14 levels in the amphipods' muscle tissues were much greater than levels of carbon-14 in organic matter found in deep ocean water.
When we lift up stranded seaweed or sea-grass, we often see amphipods jumping in all directions.
Liljeborgiidae amphipods of Southern California Coastal Bottoms with a revision of the family.
After 10 days, the test was terminated, and the numbers of living (retained amphipods) and dead (disappeared) organisms were counted by sieving the sediments.
They like to eat tiny shrimp-like crustaceans like mysids and amphipods. They also eat larval fish and plankton.
Winter flounder <40 mm TL predominantly fed on copepods, transitioning to amphipods, isopods, and bivalves with increasing size.
At the end of the experiment, the sex of each individual was determined using the size and shape of its first and second pairs of gnathopods, which are sexually dimorphic in amphipods (Hume et al., 2005).
Despite these inhospitable conditions, some of the strangest creatures are found in the trench-- creatures that produce their own light such as dragonfish, amphipods, sea cucumbers, single-celled amoeba-like organisms, and of course bacteria.
In many spring-fed streams of the midwestern United States, Gammarus amphipods are among the most important and numerically dominant shredder species (Heard et al., 1999; Ruetz et al., 2002).
Increased abundance of infaunal groups also has been observed in clam culture sites relative to uncultivated control sites (gammarid amphipods and nemertean worms: Thompson 1995; deposit-feeding polychaetes: Spencer et al.
Earlier studies have shown that palaemonid prawns can feed on both benthic macroalgae and invertebrates (Hartnoll and Salama, 1992; Janas and Baranska, 2008; Moksnes et al., 2008; Lesutiene et al., 2014) with amphipods serving as their main food (Moller et al., 1985; Persson et al., 2008).