amphipathic

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am·phi·path·ic

(am'fē-path'ik),
Denoting a molecule, such as comprises detergents or wetting agents, which contains groups with characteristically different properties, for example, both hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties.
Synonym(s): amphiphilic, amphiphobic
[amphi- + G. pathos, feeling]

amphipathic

Of a chemical structure having both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces as in the case of the phospholipid molecules of the cell membrane. Some proteins have amphipathic regions.

amphipathic

a molecule containing both HYDROPHILIC and HYDROPHOBIC components, as in a phospholipid molecule. See FLUID-MOSAIC MODEL.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Elicio Amphiphile platform enables precise targeting and delivery of immunogens and cell-therapy activators directly to the lymphatic system, the "brain center" of the immune response, to significantly amplify and enhance the body's own system of defenses, defeat solid and hematologic cancers, and prevent their recurrence.
Bianco-Peled et al., "Morphological characterization of self-assembled peptide nucleic acid amphiphiles," The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, vol.
Jaroszewski, "In vitro Plasmodium falciparum drug sensitivity assay: Inhibition of parasite growth by incorporation of stomatocytogenic amphiphiles into the erythrocyte membrane," Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, vol.
Panda, "Physicochemical studies on ion-pair amphiphiles: solution and interfacial behaviour of systems derived from sodium dodecylsulfate and n-alkyltrimethylammonium bromide homologues," Journal of Chemical Sciences, vol.
The other question concerning MIP was discussed by Barnes and coworkers [84, 85] who showed that some amphiphiles may exist in condensed Langmuir monolayers above MIP, on account for a high energy barrier of their ejection upon compression.
Characterising colloidal structures of pseudoternary phase diagrams formed by oil/ water/ amphiphile systems.
Thus, the people at Ames considered it a major breakthrough when their project created a type of solid material or "amphiphile" This material, writes Peter Fotis Kapnistos in a 2009 American Chronicle article titled, "Living ProtoCells Made in Space" formed bubbles in water: "membranous soap-like structures that had internal and external layers," he marveled.
This homogeneity is due to the fact that the biodiesel can act as an amphiphile and form micelles that have nonpolar tails and polar heads.
(5.) Auburn, Sonneville Odile and L'Alloret, Florence; Composition sous frome d'une emulsion huile-dans eau contenant un polymere amphiphile, et ses utilisations notamment cosmetiques; French Patent App.
It is, in fact, an implicit premise underlying every one of the more or less formal hypotheses about the earliest steps in the evolutionary process, from Eigen and Schuster's (1977, 1979) hypercycles to Szathmary and Demeter's (1987) stochastic corrector model, Wachtershauser's (1988, 1990) surface (clay) metabolism model, the amphiphile (fatty molecule) "envelope" model (Deamer and Oro 1980, Morowitz et al., 1988) and the more recent speculations about the role of hydrothermal vents on the sea floor.
Lipopolysaccharide, the main constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, is an amphiphile, consisting of lipid A, a core oligosaccharide, and an O-specific chain.
Stupp has also worked with nanostructures made from designed peptide amphiphile molecules that self-assemble in the presence of heparin and, combined with nanogram amounts of angiogenic growth factors; display heparin chains and greatly stimulate angiogenesis to aid wound healing.