amphetamine

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amphetamine

 [am-fet´ah-mēn]
1. a white crystalline powder used as a central nervous system stimulant. It is odorless and has a slightly bitter taste.
2. any of a group of drugs closely related to this substance and having similar actions, such as methamphetamine and dextroamphetamine. See also drug abuse and drug dependence.

am·phet·a·mine

(am-fet'ă-mēn),
A chemical compound that is structurally a sympathomimetic amine, considered a psychostimulant, and approved by the FDA to treat narcolepsy and ADHD; acts primarily by triggering release of norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin from presynaptic neurons. Because of its potential for abuse, it is scheduled by the FDA in the most restrictive classification for a drug with medical usefulness.

amphetamine

/am·phet·a·mine/ (am-fet´ah-mēn)
1. a sympathomimetic amine with a stimulating effect on both the central and peripheral nervous systems, used in the treatment of narcolepsy and attention-deficit, usually as the sulfate or aspartate salt. Abuse may lead to dependence.
2. any drug closely related to amphetamine and having similar actions, e.g., methamphetamine.

amphetamine

(ăm-fĕt′ə-mēn′, -mĭn)
n.
A synthetic compound, C9H13N, that occurs as a racemic mixture of two stereoisomers, or one of its stereoisomers (as dextroamphetamine), derivatives (as methamphetamine), or salts. Amphetamine acts as a central nervous system stimulant, and various formulations are used in the medical treatment of certain conditions (such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) and illegally as stimulants.

amphetamine

Pharmacology A CNS stimulant, anorexiant and drug of abuse Used for Hyperactivity; narcolepsy; obesity. See Drug Screening, Therapeutic drug monitoring.

am·phet·a·mine

(am-fet'ă-mēn)
A chemical compound that is structurally a sympathomimetic amine, considered a psychostimulant, and approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat narcolepsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Because of its potential for abuse, it is scheduled by the FDA in the most restrictive classification for a drug with medical usefulness.

amphetamine

Amfetamine, a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant drug with few medical uses but commonly abused to obtain a ‘high’. Amphetamine use leads to tolerance and sometimes physical dependence. Overdosage causes irritability, tremor, restlessness, insomnia, flushing, nausea and vomiting, irregularity of the pulse, delirium, hallucinations, convulsions and coma. Amphetamine can precipitate a PSYCHOSIS in predisposed people.

amphetamine

a drug that stimulates the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and inhibits sleep. Its structure is 1-phenyl-2-aminopropane.

am·phet·a·mine

(am-fet'ă-mēn)
Structurally a sympathomimetic amine, considered a psychostimulant, and approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat narcolepsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

amphetamine

a central nervous system stimulant with marked α and β adrenoreceptor activity. Its use is strictly controlled and there are few applications in veterinary medicine. Called also benzedrine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hilary Roberts, for Hitchings - who previously lived in the area - said he descended into crime through uncontrollable amphetamine abuse and that there was never any intention to hurt anyone.
The positive predictive value (PPV) of amphetamine immunoassays to detect amphetamine abuse varies from 0% (2) to 90% (3) because these assays recognize a wide variety of sympathomimetic amines (4-7) (see Table 1 in the Data Supplement that accompanies the online version of this Technical Brief at http://www.
Britain also had the highest level of amphetamine abuse in Europe.
Meanwhile, a United Nations report has named Ireland, followed by Britain, as having Europe's highest level of ecstasy and amphetamine abuse.
On the other hand, there is ample evidence that recreational use can present significant risks, including intrauterine growth retardation, decreased head circumference, premature delivery and increased maternal, fetal, and neonatal morbidity In addition, amphetamine abuse during pregnancy, which is frequently combined with alcohol consumption, use of other drugs, and smoking, may cause altered growth and neurobehavior that are still evident after puberty.
A forensic psychiatrist had told Ms Jenkins' trial that prolonged amphetamine abuse had so affected her mental state that she was genuinely convinced the Mafia were out to get her.
A UNITED Nations report has named Britain as second to Ireland in having Europe's highest level of ecstasy and amphetamine abuse.
Hospital admissions for amphetamine abuse rose slowly during the 1980s, declined in 1990 and 1991, and then surged by 1994, the latest year for which complete data was available to the researchers.
Forensic psychiatrist Philip Joseph, a witness for the defence, said prolonged amphetamine abuse had badly affected Jenkins' mental state, so much so that she was convinced the Mafia was going to kidnap and torture the two youngsters.
Britain also had the highest level of amphetamine abuse anywhere in Europe and the third highest level of Ecstasy abuse after Ireland and the Czech Republic, the agency's annual report said.