marram grass

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Related to Ammophila arenaria: Marram grass, European dune grass

marram grass

Ammophila arenaria, a grass found on coastal sand dunes. It is a XEROPHYTE that is capable of rolling its leaves to prevent water loss in dry conditions. It has deeply running stems (RHIZOMES) and roots that bind the sand in the dunes and thus is often planted to stabilize dune systems.
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Among grasses, CF increased from 19.17% (Ammophila arenaria), 26.03% (Lophochloa cristata), to 38.30% (Lygeum spartum).
In many cases, species such as European Beachgrass (Ammophila arenaria) and Iceplant (Carpobrotus edulis) were intentionally introduced to stabilize dunes and protect human infrastructure, such as homes and roads, from shifting sands (Underwood and others 2007).
Ammophila arenaria and Leymus arenarius can be found on the dune, which is closest to the shoreline.
Debido a la introduccion de la actividad forestal es comun encontrar la asociacion Lupinetum arboreus (Kholer, 1970) donde domina el arbusto Lupinus arboreus e hierbas como Ammophila arenaria, y las especies forestales tipicas, en especial, Pinus radiata.
Staff from the Lanphere Dunes Unit joined staff from the Service's Arcata, California, Fish and Wildlife Office for a day of digging European beachgrass (Ammophila arenaria) at the south end of Clam Beach.
In the late 1800s, gardeners at San Francisco's Golden Gate Park introduced European beach grass (Ammophila arenaria) to the West Coast.
Dunes range from 3-7 ft (1-2 m) in height to 984 ft (300 m), such as some of those on the coast of Aquitaine, in southwestern France, which are covered in marram grass (Ammophila arenaria).
Once it's too late, we can evaluate the loss of good grazing that follows the invasion of cheatgrass and yellow star thistle, or the compromising of dune ecology that follows the establishment of European beach grass, Ammophila arenaria.
The role of plant-parasitic nematodes and soil-borne fungi in the decline of Ammophila arenaria (L.) Link.